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Bossas and Ballads: The Lost Sessions

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Album Review

First off, these "Lost Sessions" were never actually lost. The music here was supposed to be released as the Stan Getz Quartet's first issue on A&M, and for the usual record company reasons, it was shelved instead. The tapes were in the vault and catalogs, so it's not like they were found in someone's closet. The bottom line is that Getz, already ill at this point, still had the goods. Produced by Herb Alpert (a genius in his own right even if his records don't always hold up), the bossas here are tough, innovative jazz tunes mainly written by Getz's pianist, Kenny Barron. Don't look for the gentle side of Getz that was so beautifully displayed on his early bossa records with Charlie Byrd and Antonio Carlos Jobim. Instead, this is the man who had reinvented his playing technique. With a strong foil in Barron, Getz was free to explore his form of melodic improvisation to a fuller and wider extent, which is evident if you simply check out his solos on Barron's "Sunshower" and "El Sueno," and Mal Waldron's classic ballad "Soul Eyes." Interestingly, this was Barron's date as much as it was Getz's. His compositions and musical direction are key here, and he was trying to get deeper into and stretch the samba groove in his writing. Finding Getz in such an adventurous space in his playing allowed for this. With a rhythm section that includes bassist George Mraz and drummer Victor Lewis, this disc is essential not only for fans of Getz and Barron, but for real jazzheads.

Customer Reviews


I am surprised that there are not more rave reviews about this album. I can listen to this album (especially Sunshower) all day, drifting along the gentle river of this music. Kenny Barron and Stan Getz obviously like playing together. Victor Lewis always swings, and Al Schmitt knows what he is doing. I do not think it gets any better than this.

Stan The Man

His sound here is to die for. So glad this exists to relive that point in time he played for us.

Front to Back Amazing...

This is definitely one of the best re-release ever. Stan getz at his most touching and commanding. This album is a creation in delicate beatuy. The speed and tempo of Bossas and Ballads gives you an aural experience of soultry flovor. Get's is at his creative peak in the breadth and control of the Sax. There are fast tracks and very slow, stroll at dusk tracks also. It's a compliment as a gift for any collection. This is an altogther great album evry track. No skipping.


Born: February 2, 1927 in Philadelphia, PA

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s

One of the all-time great tenor saxophonists, Stan Getz was known as "The Sound" because he had one of the most beautiful tones ever heard. Getz, whose main early influence was Lester Young, grew to be a major influence himself and to his credit he never stopped evolving. Getz had the opportunity to play in a variety of major swing big bands while a teenager due to the World War II draft. He was with Jack Teagarden (1943) when he was just 16, followed by stints with Stan Kenton (1944-1945), Jimmy...
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