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Freedom of Choice

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Customer Reviews

Almost Right

I bought this album on vinyl through a record club back in '85 and loved every song on it. Of course, everyone was familiar with Whip It, but I never met anyone who knew any of the other tracks, me included. Anyway, it instantly clicked with me. This is pure early 80's New Wave; true synthesized techno "geek" music; certainly not for most people, especially these days. If you cannot tolerate absolute weirdness, then stay far, far, far away from this. If, on the other hand, you are a fan of Devo and other odd-sounding acts like Gary Numan (Tubeway Army), Kraftwerk, Tourists (early Eurythmics), M-Factor, etc, then this is definitely the album for you! One tiny glitch that knocked it down from a 5 star rating from me: iTunes has the wrong version of Snowball associated with this collection. The correct version (as released on vinyl in 1980) can be found on the deluxe remastered version, also available through iTunes. Not sure how this happened, but it's not any kind of a loss, as I simply bought the right version individually. All the other tracks are the originals. The slightly modified version of Snowball is just fine in its own right. I'm just picky about the authenticity of my memories. Don't monkey with perfection, no matter how flawed it may be. I might be the second to post a review, but at least this one should be useful to someone. :-P

A great album marred by an incorrect version of "Snowball" and sloppy mastering.

The third studio album from Devo under their tenure with Warner Bros. Records striking a notable balance between acoustic instruments and electronics and notable for Devo's first hit single "Whip It." However, many other notable songs in this album include songs like "Snowball," "Planet Earth," "Cold War," and "Gates of Steel."

Unfortunately, this is not an accurate reissue of the album as the version of "Snowball" in this album is not the one that originally was in the album when it debuted in 1980.

A bigger problem with this release, however, is the mastering of the tracks. Some tracks, notably "Whip It," are compressed to be louder than other tracks. Imagine the surprise you may get for listening to "It's Not Right" at a moderate to high volume when "Whip It" blares uncomfortably loud, making you rush for the volume control to turn it down, only to have to turn it back up when "Snowball" comes on.

This is a great album that would have earned a five star rating had it not been for the inclusion of the wrong recording of "Snowball" and the horrid mastering, with some tracks being compressed to sound loud and others left alone. This release needs to be fixed to correct the issues, including a proper mastering that makes very restrained use of compression to preserve the dynamics of the original recordings collected in this album.

freedom of choice

great album from the spud boys/
wore out the vinyl,got the cd ripped off so now im buying the digital copy
i can remember getting turned onto this music while i was in junior high school by my moms boyfriend
when freedom of choice came out and whip it became popular -i was already sporting the de-evolution garb-- -these guys were cutting edge off the hook

Biography

Formed: 1972 in Akron, OH

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

One of new wave's most innovative and (for a time) successful bands, Devo was also perhaps one of its most misunderstood. Formed in Akron, Ohio, in 1972 by Kent State art students Jerry Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo took their name from their concept of "de-evolution" -- the idea that instead of evolving, mankind has actually regressed, as evidenced by the dysfunction and herd mentality of American society. Their music echoed this view of society as rigid, repressive, and mechanical, with appropriate...
Full Bio