10 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The folktronica icon once more muddies her guitars with gauzy beats. After latterly charting a traditional folk-rock course, Kidsticks represents a sharp—and welcome—sonic left-turn. Or rather a sonic reverse. Aided by some taut production from Fuck Buttons’ Andrew Hung, this is Orton darting down new-but-neighbouring electronic avenues to the ones she conquered in the ‘90s. The textures she builds are mesmeric (see: the restless “Moon” and “Dawnstar”) and there’s a delicacy to her work (synth ballad “1973” and the pastoral “Corduroy Legs”) that’s genuinely refreshing.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The folktronica icon once more muddies her guitars with gauzy beats. After latterly charting a traditional folk-rock course, Kidsticks represents a sharp—and welcome—sonic left-turn. Or rather a sonic reverse. Aided by some taut production from Fuck Buttons’ Andrew Hung, this is Orton darting down new-but-neighbouring electronic avenues to the ones she conquered in the ‘90s. The textures she builds are mesmeric (see: the restless “Moon” and “Dawnstar”) and there’s a delicacy to her work (synth ballad “1973” and the pastoral “Corduroy Legs”) that’s genuinely refreshing.

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