8 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Adjectives describing Montreal's Ought—such as “nervous,” “jittery,” and “art school”—likely also bring to mind a number of bands from the revered 1978-1985 postpunk landscape. Ought still maintain an outsider status, probably due to their lack (so far) of anything resembling a quirky, three-minute anti-pop song. This debut is exciting, taut, unpredictable, and imploding with an edgy energy that seems rare these days (at least when bombast isn’t part of the equation). Tracks like “The Weather Song” thrill the most when a rocky rhythm suddenly yields to a fast-moving montage of enthusiastic electric piano pounding, snare bashing, and singer Tim Beeler all duking it out. Or when slow, dripping tunes like “Habit” feature Beeler drowsily warning: “I feel/a habit/I feel a habit forming” for the last two minutes, wrought with reluctance and zero satisfaction with the situation. The opening track (“Pleasant Heart”) and the closer (“Gemini”) are ferocious and furious, the former roiling with the epitome of clanging, postpunk angular-ness and the latter building from a restrained aggressiveness to all-out rage over its nearly seven minutes.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Adjectives describing Montreal's Ought—such as “nervous,” “jittery,” and “art school”—likely also bring to mind a number of bands from the revered 1978-1985 postpunk landscape. Ought still maintain an outsider status, probably due to their lack (so far) of anything resembling a quirky, three-minute anti-pop song. This debut is exciting, taut, unpredictable, and imploding with an edgy energy that seems rare these days (at least when bombast isn’t part of the equation). Tracks like “The Weather Song” thrill the most when a rocky rhythm suddenly yields to a fast-moving montage of enthusiastic electric piano pounding, snare bashing, and singer Tim Beeler all duking it out. Or when slow, dripping tunes like “Habit” feature Beeler drowsily warning: “I feel/a habit/I feel a habit forming” for the last two minutes, wrought with reluctance and zero satisfaction with the situation. The opening track (“Pleasant Heart”) and the closer (“Gemini”) are ferocious and furious, the former roiling with the epitome of clanging, postpunk angular-ness and the latter building from a restrained aggressiveness to all-out rage over its nearly seven minutes.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
26 Ratings
26 Ratings

Pure Passion

Valandil93

The tracks on this album come straight from the heart with an unstoppable energy that I haven't seen in a long time.

Review

4violins

Ought new album, the band functions as one, passion is noted throughout the album. Beelers lyrics are rich. Awesome!

You ought to buy it...

jyo_tirmaya

This is definitely one of the strongest debuts of the year. Iss like a cross between Talking Heads and Pixies. IMPRESSIVE and RECOMMENDED!!!

About Ought

Montreal quartet Ought began in 2011, taking heavy cues from their city's thriving scene of underground politics, loft parties, and D.I.Y. culture. Formed by singer/guitarist Tim Darcy (known as Tim Beeler until taking his mother's maiden name in 2015), bassist Ben Stidworthy, keyboardist Matt May, and drummer/violinist Tim Keen, the band melded unlikely influences from both high-energy mid-'90s emo bands and airy, early college rock acts like the Feelies and Talking Heads. The bandmembers all lived together in a shared apartment/practice space, self-recording their first EP, New Calm, in 2012. They played frequently in Montreal, eventually catching the ear of indie label Constellation, which released their debut full-length album, More Than Any Other Day, in the spring of 2014. They returned with a four-track EP, Once More with Feeling, released in October of the same year. The group's second album, Sun Coming Down, appeared in September of 2015. Darcy released a solo album of more personal material in early 2017, with some of the songs pre-dating Ought. The band returned in 2018 with a new label and a new record. Room Inside the World was released by Merge Records, and was preceded by the single "These 3 Things," which included drum machines and synths that hinted at a development in their sound. ~ Fred Thomas

ORIGIN
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
FORMED
2011

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