29 Songs, 4 Hours 9 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This orchestra and conductor have, with other partners, recorded Sibelius symphonies previously. But this set finds all parties besting their respective prior efforts. The vaunted richness of Berlin’s string section often plunges Sibelius into gloriously foreboding territory—right where he should be. For being cut live, there’s a persuasive unity to each of Rattle’s interpretations. There will always be debates about the best Sibelius cycle—favoring perhaps more prototypically Nordic readings—though this strong release is a worthy entrant in the 21st century’s Sibelius revival sweepstakes.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This orchestra and conductor have, with other partners, recorded Sibelius symphonies previously. But this set finds all parties besting their respective prior efforts. The vaunted richness of Berlin’s string section often plunges Sibelius into gloriously foreboding territory—right where he should be. For being cut live, there’s a persuasive unity to each of Rattle’s interpretations. There will always be debates about the best Sibelius cycle—favoring perhaps more prototypically Nordic readings—though this strong release is a worthy entrant in the 21st century’s Sibelius revival sweepstakes.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME
9
10
11

Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

bsauerbrey ,

Rattle’s authentic Sibelius

I find so many conductors putting their own personal “stamp” on performances, which often makes the conductor a hindrance rather than channel to the true heart of a composition. Simon Rattle is able to lose himself in a composer. We hear the composer’s authentic vision rather than the more egoistic performer’s version. Bravo, Simon…to do this takes great artistry and humility both of which make you one of the small handful of master conductors today. Jean Sibelius is finally freed from the shackles of his interpreters.

More By Berlin Philharmonic

You May Also Like