iTunes

Iniciando iTunes Store.Si iTunes no se inicia, haz clic en el icono de la aplicación iTunes en el Dock de Mac o en el escritorio de Windows.Progress Indicator
Abriendo el iBooks Store.Si iBooks no se abre, haz clic en la app iBooks del Dock.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

No encontramos iTunes en este ordenador. Para usar vista previa y comprar música de Don't Explain de Joe Bonamassa & Beth Hart, descarga iTunes ya.

¿Ya tienes iTunes? Haz clic en Ya tengo iTunes, para que sea activado.

I Have iTunes Descarga gratis
iTunes para Mac y PC

Abre iTunes para escuchar un fragmento, comprar y descargar música.

Reseña de álbum

Fans of guitar master Joe Bonamassa will be delighted that 2011 was such a prolific year in his career. First came the fine, rootsy Dust Bowl, then 2, the second chapter in his Black Country Communion project's catalog. Don't Explain, a collection of soul, blues, and jazz-oriented covers in collaboration with vocal firebrand Beth Hart marks his third entry this year. The ten-song set of blues and soul is a logical extension of her vocal contribution to "No Love on the Street" from Dust Bowl. Opening is a thoroughly raucous contemporary blues reading of Ray Charles' "Sinner's Prayer," followed by a quirky version of Tom Waits' "Chocolate Jesus," and an unusual cover of contemporary jazz-pop singer/songwriter Melody Gardot's "You Heart Is as Black as Night." On this cut, a string orchestra adds a touch of perversity; it offers the impression of a femme fatale singing a Brecht-Weill number in a smoky cabaret in front of a moody string orchestra, buoyed by a brooding electric blues quintet. "For My Friends," a Bill Withers' tune, is a big, nasty, jagged blues number that keeps the funky groove intact. The title track, a number closely associated with Billie Holiday, falls flat. Hart tries too hard to employ Holiday's phrasing, the string orchestrations are overblown, and Bonamassa's crew is too reverent. This formula also mars the remake of Aretha Franklin's "Ain't No Way" that closes the set. Far better are readings of Etta James' signatories "I'd Rather Go Blind," and "Something's Got a Hold on Me." Hart's emotive, throaty delivery is perfectly suited to both songs, and she resists trying to ape James' phrasing. Since they follow one another directly, the musical difference between them also showcase's Hart's diverse abilities. The former is a soul burner, the latter a gospel blues. Bonamassa and band accent her every phrase with requisite rowdiness, sting, and grit. The pair's only vocal collaboration is a burning read of Delaney & Bonnie's "Well, Well." With Anton Fig's breaks and rim shots underscoring Arlan Scheirbaum's electric piano fills, Bonamassa's burning leads, the chunky, rhythmic foundation from guitarist Blondie Chaplin, and Carmine Rojas' bassline, Hart and the lead guitarist trade whip-smart call and response vocals with enough raw country-soul to bring the song to a new audience. While not a perfect recording, Don't Explain is a good one, whose strengths are numerous enough to warrant a second go round. ~Thom Jurek, Rovi

Biografía

Nacido(a): 08 de mayo de 1977 en Utica, NY

Género: Blues

Años de actividad: '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

Guitar mastermind Joe Bonamassa, a young player with the childhood dream of playing music similar to legends like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Eric Clapton, and Jimi Hendrix, was 22 when he inked a deal with Epic. Hailing from Utica, New York, Bonamassa could play the blues before he could drive a car. He first heard Stevie Ray Vaughan at age four and was instantly taken by Vaughan's high-powered playing. At age eight, he opened for B.B. King, and at age 12, he was playing regularly around upstate New York....
Biografía completa
Don't Explain, Joe Bonamassa
Ver en iTunes

Valoraciones de clientes

No hemos recibido suficientes valoraciones para poder mostrar un promedio de este artículo.

Los más influyentes

Contemporáneos