iTunes

Der iTunes Store wird geöffnet.Falls iTunes nicht geöffnet wird, klicken Sie auf das iTunes Symbol im Dock oder auf dem Windows Desktop.Progress Indicator
Der iBooks Store wird geöffnet.Falls iBooks nicht geöffnet wird, klicken Sie im Dock auf die iBooks-App.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

iTunes wurde auf Ihrem Computer nicht gefunden. Jetzt iTunes holen, um Inhalte aus dem iTunes Store zu laden.

iTunes ist schon installiert? Klicken Sie auf „Ich habe iTunes“, um es jetzt zu öffnen.

I Have iTunes Gratis-Download
iTunes für Mac + PC

Crache

Dieses Buch ist mit iBooks auf Ihrem Mac oder iOS-Gerät und auf Ihrem Computer mit iTunes zum Download verfügbar. Bücher können mit iBooks auf Ihrem Mac oder iOS-Gerät gelesen werden.

Beschreibung

When the ecotecture starts to degrade on the asteroid of Mymercia–killing a workgroup on the surface–Fola Hanani miraculously survives. A former missionary, she’s hacked a living out of a gengineered ecology built after the Armageddon of overheating, overpopulation, over-everything. Now she has to find out what’s causing a catastrophic biosystem failure before everyone else on Mymercia is killed. Meanwhile, onworld, in a trailer park of migrant workers, a washed-out one-hit wonder named L. Mariachi plays the guitar for a community suffering from a contagious form of soul loss. It’s a song that Fola’s implanted IA–information agent–thinks she needs to hear. Because what is happening to these lost souls is spreading at quantum speed to everyone else. Something or someone is trying to reprogram the system with the ultimate virus. And as virtuality becomes reality in this post-ecocaust world of plug-in sex components, old-world medicine women, and the cheesiest pop culture, humanity itself is about to crash....

From the Paperback edition.

Rezension: Publishers Weekly

18.10.2004 – Budz's first book, Clade, drew comparisons to William Gibson; his second proves that such claims were far from hyperbole. While Gibson twisted language to imagine technology evolved far beyond our present frame of reference, Budz instead fetishizes the wet areas where tech physically interfaces with people (Kevin Anderson coined the phrase "BioPunk" to describe Clade). A challenge to both the imagination and the intellect, the first few chapters are dense with confusing jargon and unheard-of social schemas; readers are thrown into this brave new world without a guide (nor a glossary, for that matter, making at least one reread essential). But a story quickly emerges: at some point in the future, years after an "ecocaust" has decimated the world we know and given rise to a tech-dependent society that barely resembles our own, a lethal virus is spreading among the workers on a populated asteroid called Mymercia, and threatens to worm its way through all humanity. In Budz's world, as in Gibson's, story takes a backseat to setting; this is not so much about the race against time as it is about a society that's fresher and far more arcane (neuroelectrical drug delivery, churches that own their parishioners, drugs that facilitate basic human relationships) than anything Terry Gilliam or George Orwell has imagined. Budz's unusual wordplay draws variously on the scientific rationality of Asimov, the drug-addled hangover visions of William Burroughs and the playful spirit of Dr. Seuss. Budz may be poised to become hard SF's next superstar.
Crache
In iTunes ansehen
  • 8,49 €
  • Auf dem iPhone, iPad, iPod touch und Mac verfügbar.
  • Kategorie: Science-Fiction und Fantasy
  • Erschienen: 23.11.2004
  • Verlag: Random House Publishing Group
  • Druckseiten: 384 Seiten
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • Voraussetzungen: Das Anzeigen dieses Buchs erfordert ein iOS-Gerät mit iBooks 1.3.1 (oder neuer) und iOS 4.3.3 (oder neuer) oder einen Mac mit iBooks 1.0 (oder neuer) und OS X 10.9 (oder neuer).

Kundenbewertungen

Wir haben noch nicht genügend Bewertungen erhalten, um einen Durchschnittswert für diesen Artikel anzeigen zu können.

Weiteres von Mark Budz