13 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s an uncanny quality about Daniel Lopatin’s music as Oneohtrix Point Never, the sense of a half-remembered past arranged in ways that only make it feel further away. Pivoting from the nu-metal memories of Garden of Delete, Age Of—produced in part by electro-soul auteur James Blake—has a compact, almost baroque quality, with touches of medieval music (“The Station,” “Myriad.Industries”), hymns (“Warning”), and pastoral bits of ambience (“Toys 2”), balancing the avant-garde with an instinct for melody and play that have always set Lopatin’s music apart. Most striking—and unexpected—are Lopatin’s forays into conventionally structured, vocal-based songs (“Babylon,” “Black Snow,” featuring ANOHNI), which bring his music to the brink of familiarity without ever settling in.

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s an uncanny quality about Daniel Lopatin’s music as Oneohtrix Point Never, the sense of a half-remembered past arranged in ways that only make it feel further away. Pivoting from the nu-metal memories of Garden of Delete, Age Of—produced in part by electro-soul auteur James Blake—has a compact, almost baroque quality, with touches of medieval music (“The Station,” “Myriad.Industries”), hymns (“Warning”), and pastoral bits of ambience (“Toys 2”), balancing the avant-garde with an instinct for melody and play that have always set Lopatin’s music apart. Most striking—and unexpected—are Lopatin’s forays into conventionally structured, vocal-based songs (“Babylon,” “Black Snow,” featuring ANOHNI), which bring his music to the brink of familiarity without ever settling in.

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