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Electric Youth

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Album Review

Following up her enormously popular debut, Out of the Blue, Debbie Gibson sought to grow from the teen fan base she had established, while not alienating those who made her a household name. The result is slickly produced teen pop, like her debut, but it's not as squeaky clean or as compulsively likable. That is not to say it's a bad album. "Lost in Your Eyes" is a pretty ballad that showcases her songwriting skills, her clear voice, and her talent on the piano. "Electric Youth" is a bouncy, frenetic song that is ridiculously sing-alongable, but at the same it is time hard to really identify with it unless you're 12 (or at least young at heart). "We Could Be Together," in which she basically tells her friends and family to go fly a kite, is practically anthemic in its joy at taking a risk on love: "I'll take this chance/I'll make this choice/I'll give up my security/for just the possibility/that we could be together/for a while." It's teen pop at its best: it makes you feel young, it makes you want to sing, it makes you want to fall in love. "Silence Speaks (A Thousand Words)" is a beautiful ballad about lack of communication that is vastly different from any of her other work, with a flute solo and lyrics that many adult songwriters can't nail. The same can be said for "No More Rhyme," a minor hit about a relationship's first hurdle. Gibson really exercised her writing chops on those songs, but much of the rest the album is only passable filler; "Who Loves Ya Baby?," "Helplessly in Love," and "Over the Wall" do little more than give her voice a reason to shine, while "Shades of the Past" is excruciatingly grating.

Customer Reviews

It's still good at 32 yrs old

Album write up is phoowey. Biker with tat's however a soft spot for my lady and "lost in your eyes is perfect to warm a lady's heart. Yes there is some teeny bop stuff however anyone lived and living in the 80's will enjoy if enjoyed deborah harry, blonde, bangles, ad any love song hits. woth listerning too and make your own mind up.

Oh come on! You're on the page. You know you want it.

Ok I didn't buy the whole album, but these songs are as sweet as they were when they were first released. Plus 1989 political relevance with "Over the wall' - well ok thats one I didn't buy. Love you Debbie!

Title track is the only good one

I bought the song Electric Youth because I like the film clip. Lost In Your Eyes sounds vaguely familiar but don't know where from. Wouldn't bother buying the rest of the album as the title track is the only one worth listening to.

Biography

Born: 31 August 1970 in Brooklyn, NY

Genre: Pop

Years Active: '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

Debbie Gibson became a pop phenomenon in the late '80s, scoring a string of hit singles when she was only 17. Although she was still a teenager, Gibson showed signs of being a talented pop craftsman, capable of making catchy dance-pop in the style of Madonna, as well as lush, orchestrated ballads. Gibson's time at the top of the charts was brief, but...
Full Bio
Electric Youth, Debbie Gibson
View In iTunes
  • $16.99
  • Genres: Pop, Music, Dance, Rock, Pop/Rock, Teen Pop
  • Released: 10 January 1989

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