iTunes

Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn’t open, click the iTunes application icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
Opening the iBooks Store.If iBooks doesn't open, click the iBooks app in your Dock.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music from Union by The Boxer Rebellion, download iTunes now.

Already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC

Open iTunes to preview, buy and download music.

Album Review

On their second full-length album, Union, the Anglo-American band the Boxer Rebellion continue to sound like U2 as fronted by Radiohead's Thom Yorke. The British rhythm section of bassist Adam Harrison and drummer Piers Hewitt sets up simple, repetitive patterns for each track, over which Australian guitarist Todd Howe plays simple, shimmering sequences that fill up the sound picture. On top is American singer Nathan Nicholson, singing in a whiny tenor disconnected lyrics, usually directed at a "you" who seems to be an unhappy love interest, expressing charges of betrayal and the overall inadequacies of life. The songs tend to build in intensity, without the tension being broken until the end. It's easy to imagine this working in concert, even if, on disc, the relentlessness can be wearing.

Customer Reviews

It's been 4 years waiting but...

The Boxer Rebellion are back, and with a vengance. After the band released the brilliant "Exits" in 2004 they were dropped from thier record label and were struggling to release thier second album. And now in 2009, they have been finally able to release thier second album UNION and boy, what a record. My favourites include the rocker Evacuate which most would probably know by now, the Radiohead-like Gospel of Goro Adachi, and the disco feeling of Semi Automatic. Misplaced is The Boxer Rebellion at thier most meloncholic and gives me the same beautifully sad feeling Street Spirit did all those years back. But the overall best track would definately have to be Forces, dark, heavy, and sticks in your head. The band still dont have a label to release a CD on but buying this album on iTunes will mean they'll be able to get it on CD faster.

Amazing album

This is definately an amazing album that takes you on a musical journey. It's an album that grows on you more and more with each listen and will certainly be an album that you'll keep listening to for years to come. The Boxer Rebellion have a unique and destinctive sound that you rarely come across these days. Great music by some truely talented musicians. For an independant release this is an amazing effort. By the way, the lead guitarist is an Aussie!!! This album is currently No. 6 on the US iTunes chart and is going great guns there.

Kind of makes you wonder..

How record labels can pass up on a great band like this and instead just keep pumping the same crappy shallow mainstream pop into the world. I heard "Evacuate" and that was enough for me. It's always a risk buying an album you haven't heard before because the single is usually not an idicator of the overall sound just the catchiest song. But no dissappointment here, the music is spacious mellow and uplifting very refreshing feel. very warm sounding. well worth your 10 dollars.

Biography

Formed: 2003 in London, England

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '00s, '10s

The Boxer Rebellion's moody clatter drew from a cross-section of acts including the Verve, Radiohead, and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. They weren't to be confused with the late 19th century uprising in China, or even the Philadelphia punk revivalists who shared their name. Based in London, the quartet started around 2002 when visiting American student Nathan Nicholson met guitarist Todd Howe, who was originally from Australia. The two soon hooked up with Englishmen Piers Hewitt (drums) and Adam Harrison...
Full Bio
Union, The Boxer Rebellion
View In iTunes

Customer Ratings

Influencers

Contemporaries