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Only Built for Cuban Linx, Pt. II

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Album Review

Like the original, Only Built 4 Cuban Linx, Pt. 2 sets the stage with the intro, but here it's some Raekwon history courtesy of Papa Wu. On Pt. 1 it was fictional dialog introducing a loose concept album. Besides the introductory dialog and the album's look-alike cover — tinted purple, as if it were a Cash Money screwed & chopped mix of Pt. 1 — the only traits this sequel shares with the original Linx is that it's the Wu rapper in top form, spitting out rhymes worthy of the Wu logo and pushing his guest list to work harder, as evidenced by Ghostface, Jadakiss, and Cappadonna all sounding at the top of their game. The productions are equally magnificent, with Pete Rock, the Alchemist, and even Dr. Dre all living up to their lofty reputations. Inspectah Deck and Wu secret weapon Mathematics out-RZA the RZA on their 36 Chambers-flavored cuts — the awesome "House of Flying Daggers" and "Mean Streets," respectively — but if it's possible to create a poignant beat track, it has to be the soulful loop on "Ason Jones," a tribute to Ol' Dirty Bastard made all the more moving when you notice the beat comes from the late J Dilla. Raekwon's lyrical highlights come back to back as "Gihad" slaps the current rap scene for all it's worth while "New Wu," with Ghostface, Method Man, and RZA on production, renews hope that the Wu-Tang dynasty will return with a vengeance. If it looks long at 22 tracks, it'll still leave the Wu heads wanting more. This sequel may have little to do with the original, but if the title helps to point out this is the Shaolin poet's best work since 1995's Pt. 1, then so be it.

Customer Reviews

not as good as the first

obvious this is not as good as his first solo album because lets face it that was one of the best hi hop-rap albums to ever get droped on our shelves. dont get me wrong this is a good album but it just can't beat his first i really do sugest that you pick up his first slbum

Album of the yr

By far the best hiphop release of the yr. Well worth it

Modern Classic

Shakespeare ain't got nothing on the best emcees,this piece of work is evidence.


Born: 12 January 1970 in New York

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Raekwon may not have achieved the solo stardom of his fellow Wu-Tang Clan mates Method Man or Ol' Dirty Bastard, but along with Genius/GZA and frequent partner Ghostface Killah, he's done some of the most inventive, critically acclaimed work outside the confines of the group. Born Corey Woods and also nicknamed the Chef (because he's "cookin' up some marvelous sh*t to get your mouth watering"), Raekwon joined the Staten Island, NY-based Wu-Tang collective in the early '90s and played an important...
Full Bio