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This Time They Told the Truth: The Columbia Years

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Album Review

The best of Hill's late-'70s stay at Columbia Records, This Time They Told the Truth might be a bit of a shock to listeners not familiar with the period, for Hill's always smooth vocals are embellished with a very disco-fied production, not always disturbing, but definitely obtrusive in several places. The songs themselves are quite good (distilled from 1978's Let's Make a Deal and 1979's The Mark of Z.Z. Hill), including "Stop by and Love Me Sometime," "A Message to the Ladies" and the title track.

Biography

Born: 30 September 1935 in Naples, TX

Genre: Blues

Years Active: '70s

Texas-born singer Z.Z. Hill managed to resuscitate both his own semi-flagging career and the entire genre at large when he signed on at Jackson, MS-based Malaco Records in 1980 and began growling his way through some of the most uncompromising blues to be unleashed on black radio stations in many a moon. His impressive 1982 Malaco album Down Home Blues remained on Billboard's soul album charts for nearly two years, an extraordinary run for such a blatantly bluesy LP. His songs "Down Home Blues" and...
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This Time They Told the Truth: The Columbia Years, Z.Z. Hill
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