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Hannibal (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

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Album Review

Hannibal, director Ridley Scott's follow-up to Jonathan Demme's The Silence of the Lambs, is a very different work from its predecessor. A mystery/thriller, The Silence of the Lambs focused on the tense exchanges between a highly intelligent serial killer and a novice FBI agent in an American prison, and Howard Shore's score echoed the film's claustrophobic, subterranean settings. In Hannibal, the killer, Dr. Hannibal "the Cannibal" Lecter, is at large, living in Florence, though he eventually returns to the U.S. for his confrontation with his old nemesis. Appropriately, Hans Zimmer has created a score steeped in classical influences, particularly Italian opera. Using fast-tempo percussion and haunting sweeps of strings, plus a boys choir, he underscores the film's suspenseful moments, but only in a few passages, notably during "Let My Home Be My Gallows," which accompanies Lecter's encounter with an Italian police inspector, does the soundtrack include portions of the film's moments of outright horror. Zimmer's work is augmented by other classical and pseudo-classical pieces: Glenn Gould's "Aria da Capo" from Bach's Goldberg Variations; Klaus Badelt's "Gourmet Valse Tartare," a waltz reminiscent of Johann Strauss' "The Blue Danube"; "Firenze Di Notte" by Martin Tillman and Mel Wesson; and Patrick Cassidy's "Vide Cor Meum," a piece of opera pastiche featuring Danielle De Niese and Bruno Lazzaretti and set to a text by Dante. Anthony Hopkins, who plays Lecter, is featured speaking excerpts from his literary lectures as a library curator and reciting a letter to the FBI agent filled with his character's black humor. With its emphasis on the film's classical pretensions, the soundtrack gives only a mild sense of the violent aspects of the movie, though Zimmer's "For a Small Stipend," with its mixture of synthesized and orchestral music with sound effects, carries some of that tone. Still, listening to the album is a far less disturbing experience than watching the film.

Customer Reviews

Haunting and beauty

This works extremely well during the picture. It is an album of classical like nature. It fits well into the world of Hannibal. From track 7 onwards are the highlights to mention. They are like one giant concert piece. There is a nice suprise at the end of track 11

hannibal

great movie, great soundtrack, you feel the music in the pit of your stomach

Sends Chills down my spine

The opening track is as creepy as hell, Hopkins delivers a perfect opening to this magnificent sound track, I read the book and watched the movie, and this is a perfect back drop ...

I love Hans Zimmers movie soundtracks they just have that " edge " another favourite is The Da Vinci Code .... 10 stars

Biography

Born: 12 September 1957 in Frankfurt, Germany

Genre: Soundtrack

Years Active: '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

One of the most prolific film composers of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, Hans Zimmer was born September 12, 1957 in Frankfurt, Germany; after relocating to London as a teen, he later wrote advertising jingles for Air-Edel Associates, and in 1980 collaborated with the Buggles on their LP The Age of Plastic and its accompanying hit "Video Killed the Radio Star." A stint with Ultravox followed before Zimmer next surfaced with the Italian avant-garde group Krisma; he then formed a partnership...
Full Bio