iTunes

Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn’t open, click the iTunes application icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
Opening the iBooks Store.If iBooks doesn't open, click the iBooks app in your Dock.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music by [?], download iTunes now.

Already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC

Los Brincos

View In iTunes

To preview a song, mouse over the title and click Play. Open iTunes to buy and download music.

Biography

The impressive history of this four-piece Spanish rock band from the 1960s began when Juan Pardo and Fernando Arbex met at a local club called Norba, sharing their passion for music and deciding to create a new project that was later called los Brincos. When ex-los Estudiantes Luis Sartorius was named director of the label Novola, the executive chose los Brincos to create an alternative to the Beatles. The band's name was an idea of Rosa Arbex who dismissed a proposition of calling the act Las Ovejas Negras. After Manuel González and Junior joined in, the group started composing, writing songs in English and Spanish. In 1964, Luis Sartorius passed away after a car accident, but even when that tragic news hardly hit the band, the four musicians were determined to go ahead. After recording their debut album, los Brincos's "Flamenco" became their first hit. To make the following record, the group moved to Milan in 1966. Soon after, its song "Tú Me Dijiste Adios" started climbing the charts. After performing at Benidorm's Festival, Juan Pardo and Junior decided to leave the act to start their own project, being replaced by Vicente Ramírez and Miguel Morales. In 1967, los Brincos's "Lola" became their breakthrough. After recording a third album in 1968, the band started to experiment with their music, moving to the U.S. in 1970 to make an alternative record called Mundodemoniocarne with Oscar Lasprilla on keyboards. Soon after, los Brincos broke up, leaving behind one of the most outstanding music experiences ever.

Top Songs

Genre
Years Active:

'60s, '70s

Followers

Contemporaries