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Safeways Here We Come

Chixdiggit!

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Album Review

After a six-year break, the SoCal-influenced Canadians returned with a seven-song EP. Nothing much changed over their time off, and the guitar-driven material on Safeways Here We Come is the same fervent but melodic pop-punky stuff that Chixdiggit! fans have come to expect. With the band's NOFX-meets-Dickies style, Fat Wreck (more so than Sub Pop) is a perfect fit for Chixdiggit!, and their comfort level shows. It's no doubt they're having fun here, as they goofily burn through songs about lust for a girl named Gabrielle ("Hot n Horny"), a girl named after an Asian dish (“Miso Ramen”), a girl with a weird hairstyle (“Swedish Rat”), and, of course, hockey (“I Hate Basketball”).

Biography

Formed: 1991 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Originally using the future band moniker merely as an excuse to sell T-shirts with "Chixdiggit!" in cheesy metal logos, these guys figured that they should at least start a group with that name. So in 1991, without any musical experience or ability to read music, Mark O'Flaherty (guitar), K.J. Jansen (vocals/guitar), and Michael Eggermont (bass) got together with the intention of rocking out Calgary along with the rest of Canada. For...
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Safeways Here We Come, Chixdiggit!
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