iTunes

Abrindo a iTunes Store.Se o iTunes não abrir, clique no ícone de aplicativo do iTunes no dock ou área de trabalho do Windows.Indicador de progresso
Abrindo a iBooks Store.Se o iBooks não abrir, clique no app iBooks em seu dock.Indicador de progresso
iTunes

O iTunes é a maneira mais fácil de organizar e aumentar sua coleção de mídia digital.

Não foi possível encontrar o iTunes no seu computador. Para ouvir uma prévia e comprar música Don't Tell Columbus de @artistName[?]

Já tem o iTunes? Clique em Já tenho o iTunes para abri-lo agora.

Eu tenho o iTunes Download grátis
iTunes para Mac + PC

Don't Tell Columbus

Abra o iTunes para ouvir prévias, comprar e baixar música.

Opinião do álbum

Depending on which album you get from Graham Parker these days, he's either set on reminding us that he's still capable of serving up the sort of lean and feisty rock & roll that made him a cult hero years ago, or demonstrating that he's matured into a pithy and very gifted singer/songwriter with the passage of time. 2007's Don't Tell Columbus falls into the latter category (and follows his 2005 studio set Songs of No Consequence, which happened to fit into the former scenario), and while there are several examples of his acerbic side on display (most notably "England's Latest Clown," which concerns someone quite a bit like Pete Doherty, and "Stick to the Plan," a witty but poison-penned meditation on George W. Bush's handling of Hurricane Katrina), Parker's more gentle side dominates Don't Tell Columbus, and it serves him well on these tunes. The title cut is a cautious celebration of his adopted home in the guise of a road story, "The Other Side of the Reservoir" and "Suspension Bridge" are richly detailed slice-of-life stories, "Love of Delusion" is an intelligent but uncompromising story of a relationship gone sour, and "Somebody Saved Me" is an equally honest story from the other side of the coin. While Parker doesn't rock especially hard here, the arrangements are taut, concise and full-bodied even when the electric guitars fade into the backdrop, and Parker handles the lion's share of the guitar work himself with an easy confidence, while Mike Gent shines on drums and Ryan Barnum adds some well-placed keyboard textures that give the tunes welcome color and balance. If Don't Tell Columbus doesn't sound like it's markedly superior to such recent Graham Parker efforts as Your Country and Songs of No Consequence, those were both strong albums and so is this, and what impresses most at this stage of Parker's career is his consistency — he's writing first-rate songs and putting them on record with heart, soul and conviction, and he hasn't sounded this reliably inspired since the mid-'80s. It's a fine thing he's still around.

Biografia

Nascido em: November/11/1950 em East London, England

Gênero: Rock

Anos em atividade: '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

Stereotyped early in his career as the quintessential angry young man, Graham Parker was one of the most successful singer/songwriters to emerge from England's pub rock scene in the early '70s. Drawing heavily from Van Morrison and the Rolling Stones, Parker developed a sinewy fusion of driving rock & roll and confessional folk-rock, highlighted by his indignant passion, biting sarcasm, and bristling anger. At the outset of his career, his albums crackled with pub rock energy, snide witticisms,...
Biografia completa
Don't Tell Columbus, Graham Parker
Ver no iTunes

Avaliações de clientes

Não recebemos avaliações suficientes para exibir uma média para este item.

Influências

Seguidores

Contemporâneos