13 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Unapologetically wearing ‘90s grunge influences on its sleeves, the Vancouver hard rock quintet Art of Dying not only recalls that time when Pacific Northwest longhairs ruled the airwaves; it also throws in some alt-metal inspiration that fans of Hinder and Incubus will immediately find familiar. In addition, Vices and Virtues abounds on the band's three-part vocal harmonies. While you can hear the members soaring on the brash opener “Die Trying,” Art of Dying's vocal prowess comes across much clearer on the arena-friendly power ballad “Sorry,” where not one note is wasted; from start to finish the band’s congruent harmonies play with an airtight flawlessness. Frontman Jonny Hetherington’s vocal versatility is put to the test all over this album. Immediately following the harmonious “Sorry,” he comes in screaming on “Whole World’s Crazy,” as though he regularly gargles with whiskey and sand. The guitar work is also notable on this tune, as Greg Bradley and Tavis Stanley go head-to-head like two alpha rams. The romantic serenade “Breathe Again” ends with plenty of room for those harmonies to stretch out.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Unapologetically wearing ‘90s grunge influences on its sleeves, the Vancouver hard rock quintet Art of Dying not only recalls that time when Pacific Northwest longhairs ruled the airwaves; it also throws in some alt-metal inspiration that fans of Hinder and Incubus will immediately find familiar. In addition, Vices and Virtues abounds on the band's three-part vocal harmonies. While you can hear the members soaring on the brash opener “Die Trying,” Art of Dying's vocal prowess comes across much clearer on the arena-friendly power ballad “Sorry,” where not one note is wasted; from start to finish the band’s congruent harmonies play with an airtight flawlessness. Frontman Jonny Hetherington’s vocal versatility is put to the test all over this album. Immediately following the harmonious “Sorry,” he comes in screaming on “Whole World’s Crazy,” as though he regularly gargles with whiskey and sand. The guitar work is also notable on this tune, as Greg Bradley and Tavis Stanley go head-to-head like two alpha rams. The romantic serenade “Breathe Again” ends with plenty of room for those harmonies to stretch out.

TITLE TIME
3:49
2:42
4:25
3:44
3:22
3:50
3:05
3:56
5:03
4:20
4:11
3:00
3:52

About Art of Dying

One of Canada's more explosive hard rock acts, Vancouver-based five-piece Art of Dying's raucous blend of ardent post-grunge and blistering, three-part harmony-laden alt-metal falls somewhere between Pearl Jam, Incubus, and Hinder. Formed in the mid-2000s around the talents of Jonny Hetherington (vocals), Greg Bradley (guitar), Tavis Stanley (guitar), Cale Gontier (bass), and Jeff Brown (drum), the band released its eponymous debut in 2006 on its own label, Thorny Bleeder, resulting in critical acclaim both at home and abroad, as well as shows and tours with the likes of Seether, Disturbed, and Theory of a Deadman. The group's sophomore effort (and Reprise Records debut) Vices and Virtues arrived in March of 2011. The following year saw the release of the CD/DVD Let the Fire Burn, a ten-track set of acoustic fan favorites. The band spent the next few years on the road, eventually heading back into the studio with producer David Bendeth (Bring Me the Horizon, Breaking Benjamin) to lay down tracks for its third studio long-player. The resulting Eleven Seven-issued Rise Above arrived in May 2015. The Nevermore EP followed one year later on Vices and Virtues. ~ James Christopher Monger

  • ORIGIN
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Cana
  • GENRE
    Rock

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