10 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Since Wolf Parade's demise, vocalist/keyboardist Spencer Krug has cooked up a number of projects that let him stretch in a variety of directions. Here, with his project Moonface, he partners with the Finnish band Siinai. The Finns paint a musical background that Krug fleshes out with vocals and keyboards. Heartbreaking Bravery resonates with the success of an artful collaboration: Siinai’s textures range from woodsy and pastoral (in an electronic way) to robust and dramatic, and Krug’s lyrics (both obtuse and pointed, as usual) work beautifully in building the songs alongside his always-unique keyboard work. There are dance beats, anthemic post-rockers, moody and tense atmospherics, and heartache. Lots of heartache. But the best thing about Heartbreaking Bravery is that Krug is back to the comforts of actual song structures, woven from muscular and effective melodies. Yet every tune palpitates with unease, an emotional discomfort that keeps it dark and interesting. Fans longing for the days of Wolf Parade should be plenty pleased with this striking, powerful work. If in doubt, start with “Teary Eyes and Bloody Lips.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Since Wolf Parade's demise, vocalist/keyboardist Spencer Krug has cooked up a number of projects that let him stretch in a variety of directions. Here, with his project Moonface, he partners with the Finnish band Siinai. The Finns paint a musical background that Krug fleshes out with vocals and keyboards. Heartbreaking Bravery resonates with the success of an artful collaboration: Siinai’s textures range from woodsy and pastoral (in an electronic way) to robust and dramatic, and Krug’s lyrics (both obtuse and pointed, as usual) work beautifully in building the songs alongside his always-unique keyboard work. There are dance beats, anthemic post-rockers, moody and tense atmospherics, and heartache. Lots of heartache. But the best thing about Heartbreaking Bravery is that Krug is back to the comforts of actual song structures, woven from muscular and effective melodies. Yet every tune palpitates with unease, an emotional discomfort that keeps it dark and interesting. Fans longing for the days of Wolf Parade should be plenty pleased with this striking, powerful work. If in doubt, start with “Teary Eyes and Bloody Lips.”

TITLE TIME
5:37
5:05
4:00
5:53
2:46
2:09
4:45
7:38
2:45
5:37

About Moonface

Moonface began in 2010 as a solo project of already-incredibly-busy Montreal, Canada multi-instrumentalist Spencer Krug. Krug was at that point perhaps best known as the pianist, singer, and a primary songwriter for indie bands Wolf Parade and Sunset Rubdown, but he has also logged time with Frog Eyes, Swan Lake, Fifths of Seven, and more. The incredibly prolific songwriter used Moonface as an outlet for his dark pop and melodious experiments that didn't fit with any other of his other more collaborative projects. The project debuted in recorded form with 2010's Dreamland EP: Marimba & Shit-Drums on the Jagjaguwar label, followed the next year by the full-length Organ Music Not Vibraphone Like I'd Hoped. Moonface's second album, Heartbreaking Bravery, was released in 2012, with Julia with Blue Jeans arriving the following year. Krug relocated to Finland that year, recording the album with Helsinki band Siinai, who had toured Europe with Wolf Parade in 2009. Krug sang and played keyboards on the album, with Siinai filling out its moody compositions. He stayed on in Finland until 2014, recording the songs that would appear on the City Wrecker EP that year, before moving back to Canada. Krug would team up with the Finnish Krautrockers once again in 2016 for the full-length outing My Best Human Face. ~ Fred Thomas

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