6 Songs, 1 Hour, 5 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Well, that’s it — we’re exhausted, physically and emotionally. And you will be too from the very second you let this album sink in. Spreading six multi-movement songs across 65 debilitating minutes, Marrow of the Spirit treats forest-dwelling black metal like a transcendent purification process — a way of facing your greatest fears head on, no matter what form they take. In some cases, that can mean a passage as serene and profoundly sad as the icy acoustic intro of “The Watcher’s Monolith” or the bubbling brook, chirping birds, and lonesome cello of “They Escaped the Weight of Darkness.” For the most part, though, Agalloch is unwilling to let listeners fully understand their surroundings. They’d rather maintain a masterful level of tension throughout, from the pure anguish of “Black Lake Nidstang” — a dizzying epic that deserves its own EP — to the hypnotic heathenism of “Into the Painted Grey.” Like Agalloch’s admitted influences (Katatonia, Swans, Godspeed You Black Emperor), this is as cathartic as music gets without having to pay someone by the hour.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Well, that’s it — we’re exhausted, physically and emotionally. And you will be too from the very second you let this album sink in. Spreading six multi-movement songs across 65 debilitating minutes, Marrow of the Spirit treats forest-dwelling black metal like a transcendent purification process — a way of facing your greatest fears head on, no matter what form they take. In some cases, that can mean a passage as serene and profoundly sad as the icy acoustic intro of “The Watcher’s Monolith” or the bubbling brook, chirping birds, and lonesome cello of “They Escaped the Weight of Darkness.” For the most part, though, Agalloch is unwilling to let listeners fully understand their surroundings. They’d rather maintain a masterful level of tension throughout, from the pure anguish of “Black Lake Nidstang” — a dizzying epic that deserves its own EP — to the hypnotic heathenism of “Into the Painted Grey.” Like Agalloch’s admitted influences (Katatonia, Swans, Godspeed You Black Emperor), this is as cathartic as music gets without having to pay someone by the hour.

TITLE TIME
3:41
12:25
11:46
17:34
9:39
10:27

About Agalloch

The origins of Agalloch date back to 1995 and the disintegration of the band Aeolachrymae. As that group died, three phoenixes emerged from the ashes, Sussurrus Inanis, Nothing, and Agalloch. Mixing black metal with atmospheric textures, gothic doom, and neo-folk and post-rock touches, the Portland, OR-based group quickly developed a rabid cult following. Their first demo, From Which of This Oak, was recorded in 1996; in 1998, they recorded another demo and shopped it around to labels. Their efforts paid off as the group landed a deal with The End Records. The following year the guys -- vocalist/guitarist John Haughm, bassist Jason William Walton, guitarist John Anderson, and keyboardist Shane Breyer -- released their experimental and brooding debut, Pale Folklore. The EP Of Stone, Wind and Pillor appeared in 2001 before Agalloch's critically acclaimed sophomore effort, The Mantle, hit stores in 2002. Four years passed before the band released their next full-length, Ashes Against the Grain, again to high critical and fan praise. ~ Gary Hill

  • ORIGIN
    Portland, OR
  • GENRE
    Metal
  • FORMED
    1995

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