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Sam's Town

The Killers

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Album Review

On the 2006 follow-up to their wildly successful debut, the Killers continue their torrid affair with 1980s new wave, but manage to incorporate the sounds of that era, particularly heavy use of synthesizers, more seamlessly into the mix. This is due, at least in part, to the presence of veteran producers Flood and Alan Moulder (Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, U2). While the Las Vegas-based act's Britpop-influenced songs are still marked by Brandon Flower's emotive vocals and bold synth lines, Dave Keuning's guitar riffs are amped up on much of the record. Other highlights of this brooding album are the dramatic "Bones" and the yearning title track, songs that prove that the Killers may have unforeseen substance lurking under their carefully rendered style., Rovi

Customer Reviews

Good, but not OK

In a recent interview, Brandon Flowers (The Killers' lead singer) proudly equated Sam's Town to Radiohead's seminal album OK Computer. Easy there, killer! He's right about this definitely not being a typical 3-piece, 3-chord alternative outfit. There's a lot here to be proud of: solid songwriting, creative song structures, and impeccable production. On the surface, it's easy to see how Flower's operatic singing lends itself to comparison with Radiohead's Thom Yorke, and there are certainly moments that are just as powerful and emotionally-filled as on OK Computer. And therein lies the problem -- this album is so emotionally jam-packed and self-consciously epic that it just kind of makes you roll your eyes after a few listens. You become aware very soon into the album that it's all pomp without much to say. OK Computer, on the other hand, complements its epic sweeps with contemplative lulls, jarring rhythm changes and stellar songwriting. This is no doubt a solid piece of music, but beware of those who shout "masterpiece".

Fresh!

Although it does not sound like their debut album "Hot Fuss" it still delivers. Brandon Flowers' voice does not sound quite the same as before. Therefore; It may take a few listens to get into it, but once you are into it your stuck. I cannot stop listening to this album. It's worth it. Definatly worth it.

Brilliant work.

To be honest, the first time that I heard Sam's Town, I was expecting a great album. A few tracks in, I was quite disappointed. I never really was a fan of the first single 'When You Were Young', but I heard that this was being pumped as a masterpiece, and so I was expecting something great, as often the lead off single these days doesn't reflect the album. Which, after a few listens, it really doesn't. This album is one of the most interesting alternative albums I've ever heard. It's not the kind of album that's immediately catchy, and it's not the kind of album that one can just 'pick the best tracks' off of, because, the truth is, the whole album is great. As well, none of these songs really seem to 'get old' over too many listens. I can still listen to the album from start to finish and enjoy every minute. What it comes down to, is that Sam's Town is a masterpiece, and, while it is a huge change of sound for the Killers, it's a great way to go.

Biography

Formed: 2002 in Las Vegas, NV

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '00s, '10s

Few bands in the early 2000s rose so quickly to the forefront of pop music as the Killers. With a mix of '80s-styled synth pop and fashionista charm, the band's street-smart debut, Hot Fuss, became one of 2004's biggest releases, spawning four singles and catapulting the group — particularly their dandyish, 22-year-old frontman, Brandon Flowers — into the international spotlight. Hot Fuss reveled in the garish glitz of the band's native Las Vegas, spinning tales of androgynous girlfriends...
Full bio