10 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With The Beatles wrapping up their career, The Rolling Stones eagerly picked up the slack as The World's Greatest Rock 'n' Roll Band. The Stones hired Mick Taylor to replace Brian Jones, who had died within a month of his departure. With the 20-year-old guitar prodigy adding his lyrical style to the group, the Stones became a fearsome live act. Bootlegs of concerts with Taylor are among the prized possessions of hardcore Stones fans, and this live album—recorded in late November 1969—is official proof of the band's musical command. It's hard to imagine that now-established classics like "Jumpin' Jack Flash," "Midnight Rambler," "Sympathy for the Devil," "Honky Tonk Women," and "Street Fighting Man" were ever new to audiences, yet all of those songs were first aired on this tour. Two Chuck Berry numbers, "Carol" and "Little Queenie," pay tribute to the Stones' roots, while Robert Johnson's "Love in Vain" shows what the band can do with the blues. Every song equals or improves on its studio version, with "Stray Cat Blues," in particular, sounding nastier than ever.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With The Beatles wrapping up their career, The Rolling Stones eagerly picked up the slack as The World's Greatest Rock 'n' Roll Band. The Stones hired Mick Taylor to replace Brian Jones, who had died within a month of his departure. With the 20-year-old guitar prodigy adding his lyrical style to the group, the Stones became a fearsome live act. Bootlegs of concerts with Taylor are among the prized possessions of hardcore Stones fans, and this live album—recorded in late November 1969—is official proof of the band's musical command. It's hard to imagine that now-established classics like "Jumpin' Jack Flash," "Midnight Rambler," "Sympathy for the Devil," "Honky Tonk Women," and "Street Fighting Man" were ever new to audiences, yet all of those songs were first aired on this tour. Two Chuck Berry numbers, "Carol" and "Little Queenie," pay tribute to the Stones' roots, while Robert Johnson's "Love in Vain" shows what the band can do with the blues. Every song equals or improves on its studio version, with "Stray Cat Blues," in particular, sounding nastier than ever.

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