9 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Stones closed the '60s with one of their most emblematic albums, and perhaps their best ever. Let It Bleed is a deeply gritty document of the band at a soaring peak - one that came as Mick Jagger and Keith Richards realized that the entire world wasn't necessarily ready to buy into the decade's dream of a greater society. "Gimmie Shelter" and "You Can't Always Get What You Want" were the epics that framed the album and the emotions of characters who'd halfway convinced themselves of endless possibilities. The Stones were hardly backing down musically; these cuts' creativity and heart rivaled what the Beatles were doing in 1969: Hard rock rarely got as brutal as "Live With Me" and "Monkey Man," country rock as funny as "Country Honk" (a piss-take on "Honky Tonk Women"), or as deeply felt as Keith's "You Got the Silver."

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Stones closed the '60s with one of their most emblematic albums, and perhaps their best ever. Let It Bleed is a deeply gritty document of the band at a soaring peak - one that came as Mick Jagger and Keith Richards realized that the entire world wasn't necessarily ready to buy into the decade's dream of a greater society. "Gimmie Shelter" and "You Can't Always Get What You Want" were the epics that framed the album and the emotions of characters who'd halfway convinced themselves of endless possibilities. The Stones were hardly backing down musically; these cuts' creativity and heart rivaled what the Beatles were doing in 1969: Hard rock rarely got as brutal as "Live With Me" and "Monkey Man," country rock as funny as "Country Honk" (a piss-take on "Honky Tonk Women"), or as deeply felt as Keith's "You Got the Silver."

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