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Unisex

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Album Review

Blueboy may very well be the most effete and gentle band in the history of indie-pop. Rather than hacking out shambling pop like some of their labelmates on Sarah Records, they deal in jazzy acoustic guitars, melodramatic strings, tinkling pianos, and some of the most affectedly sweet vocals to be found anywhere — the closest available comparison would be the baroque pop of Shelleyan Orphan. It would be easy to dismiss Unisex as effeminate English easy-listening, but surprisingly, the album is incredibly well-written, and a pleasant listen throughout. After a while, their style doesn't seem as bland and conventional as it does at first — they've taken "pop" to such an extreme that they sound completely unlike any other band.

Biography

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '90s

Reading, England-based indie pop outfit Blueboy were led by singer Keith Girdler and guitarist Paul Stewart, who previously teamed in the little-known Feverfew. Upon recording the first Blueboy demo in a friend's shed, the duo sent a copy of the song "Clearer" to the famed Sarah Records label, which agreed to release the track as a single in the fall of 1991; with the subsequent additions of second guitarist Harvey Williams (of Field Mice/Another Sunny Day fame), singer/cellist Gemma Townlet, bassist...
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Unisex, Blueboy
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