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The Beagles

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Album Review

Although this was kind of an exploitative album as the soundtrack to a cartoon by a group that didn't exist in real life, it's actually not bad mid-'60s pop/rock. Those involved in this creation remain something of a mystery, but they're not bad singers, often coming together in Beatlesque dual harmonies, yet with a bit of a rougher and gutsier edge than you might expect. The playing is pretty competent period rock, with a Merseybeat-ish British Invasion tilt to some of the melodies but very American qualities to some of the production, particularly as it favors an integrated piano/organ/sax/rhythm guitar sound more than the guitar leads that were more prominent in many British bands. (And the brief sax solo on "I'd Join the Foreign Legion" is right out of Motown!) Even some of the cuts with rather kiddie-based lyrics, like "Humpty Dumpty," turn out to rave fairly hard. No, this isn't a major work, but it's a fun listen, and not something that would necessarily be enjoyed only by bubblegum enthusiasts. The entire album was included as a "bonus LP" on the CD reissue We're the Banana Splits/Here Come the Beagles, which also includes the Banana Splits album We're the Banana Splits and some non-LP cuts by the Banana Splits. That 1995 CD is hard to find, but it's probably easier to find than the rare original LP.

Biography

Genre: Comedy

Years Active: '60s

Presented on CBS in September 1966, this obvious takeoff on the Beatles name only lasted one season. The Beagles were two animated dogs, Stringer and Tubby, whose identities were built roughly on the tried and true comedic antics of Abbott & Costello and Laurel & Hardy. The series' premise involved the canines being put into various adventures instigated by their manager, Scotty, where the duo would learn a valuable lesson that they would base a song around. The show was produced by Total...
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The Beagles, The Beagles
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