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Judy Boucher

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b. St. Vincent, West Indies. Boucher arrived in the UK in the mid-60s and began singing alongside her brother in the popular dance band Judy Jack And the Beanstalks. The band performed around the south east of England until Boucher retired from singing to raise a family. She was enticed back into the business and recording studio by her friend Felix Da Silva, who had been involved in producing sentimental love songs for notable vocalists including Tim Chandell and Joyce Bond. Da Silva arranged a recording session with Sonny Roberts who wrote and produced Boucher’s debut, ‘Dreaming Of A Little Island’, and the follow-up, ‘Lovely Paradise’. Although the releases did not make a big impression on the charts, Roberts was encouraged by the commercial success of Boucher’s recordings and produced her debut, Can’t Be With You Tonight, which briefly entered the UK Top 100 album chart in 1987. The title track was lifted for single release and attracted sufficient interest to achieve a placing on the much-coveted national radio playlist. The tale of the trials of cuckoldry, sung over a steadfast rhythm, crossed into the mainstream thanks to her crystal-clear vocals. The single peaked at number 2 in the UK Top 10 and charted across Europe. She followed this release with ‘You Caught My Eye’, which was an equally successful Top 20 hit but marked the end of her brush with international fame. Following her sojourn into the mainstream she maintained a low profile until 1995, when she recorded Doris Day’s ‘Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera)’, inspired by Nora Dean’s earlier interpretation of the song. The single, produced by Derrick Fervrier, who played bass on her initial recordings, secured a comfortable position on the reggae charts, and was followed by the equally popular ‘Stick Around’. She continues to maintain a high profile in the big people’s chart with her brand of ‘easy listening’ lover’s rock.

Top Songs


St. Vincent

Years Active:

'90s, '00s