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Since Radiohead’s celebrated 2011 album King of Limbs found the band venturing deeper into electronic-dappled topographies, it was inevitable for remixes to follow. Tkol Rmx 1234567 shuffles the original song sequence to flow under these infiltrated reworkings like an album unto itself. Caribou’s adaptation of “Little by Little” starts things with minimally funky rhythms, as light piano touches intertwine with Thom Yorke’s chopped-up and slightly panicked croon. Jacques Greene decided to leave most of Yorke’s original vocal take intact while the rest of “Lotus Flower” gets stripped down and rebuilt with lightly shuffling rhythms that unsuspectingly morph into a mellow groove trimmed in retro house trappings. From the five altered versions of “Bloom,” the Harmonic 313 remix stands out with percolating beats and vintage synthesizer drones that sound Stereolab-inspired before the Mark Pritchard remix injects gradually increasing rhythms, giving the tune a more urgent tension. Four Tet’s psychedelic-infused synth drones make the modified “Separator” another brilliant standout.

Biography

Formed: 1989 in Oxford, England

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

At some point in the early 21st century, Radiohead became something more than a band: they became a touchstone for everything that is fearless and adventurous in rock, inheriting the throne from David Bowie, Pink Floyd, and the Talking Heads. The latter group gave the band its name -- it's an album track on 1986's True Stories -- but Radiohead never sounded much like the Heads, nor did they take much from Bowie apart from their willingness to experiment. Instead, they spliced Floyd's spaciness with...
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