Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn’t open, click the iTunes icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
Opening the iBooks Store.If iBooks doesn't open, click the iBooks app in your Dock.Progress Indicator

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music from I Concentrate On You by Lee Konitz & Red Mitchell, download iTunes now.

Do you already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC

I Concentrate On You

Open iTunes to preview, buy and download music.

Album Review

Lee Konitz has been a constant explorer throughout most of his career, never satisfied with a standard approach or falling into a rut with a particular instrumentation. This 1974 duo session with bassist Red Mitchell, which focuses exclusively on the works of Cole Porter, is one great example. With an inventive accompanist like Mitchell spurring him on, the alto saxophonist is able to work magical variations of the familiar Porter works, while Konitz retains his remarkable dry signature tone. "Easy to Love" has a bit of a bittersweet air in his hands, as does the more deliberate "Ev'rytime We Say Goodbye." Mitchell is a bit more subdued in the hip treatment of "'You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To," as Konitz's intricate improvisation works its magic. The usually over the top "Love for Sale" features an understated arrangement here. Mitchell switches to piano for "Night and Day," playing a soft bop line behind the leader. Three alternate takes were added for the 1987 CD reissue of this 1974 session, which will have great appeal to fans of Lee Konitz.


Born: 13 October 1927 in Chicago, IL

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

One of the most individual of all altoists (and one of the few in the 1950s who did not sound like a cousin of Charlie Parker), the cool-toned Lee Konitz has always had a strong musical curiosity that has led him to consistently take chances and stretch himself, usually quite successfully. Early on he studied clarinet, switched to alto, and played with Jerry Wald. Konitz gained some attention for his solos with Claude Thornhill & His Orchestra (1947). He began studying with Lennie Tristano, who had...
Full bio