iTunes

Ouverture de l’iTunes Store en cours…Si iTunes ne s’ouvre pas, cliquez sur l’icône de l’application iTunes dans votre Dock Mac ou sur votre bureau Windows.Progress Indicator
Ouverture de l’iBooks Store.Si iBooks ne s’ouvre pas, cliquez sur l’app iBooks dans votre Dock.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

iTunes est introuvable sur votre ordinateur. Pour écouter des extraits et acheter des morceaux de « 1966 » par Karen Dalton, téléchargez iTunes.

Vous avez déjà iTunes ? Cliquez sur « J’ai déjà iTunes » pour l’ouvrir dès maintenant.

I Have iTunes Téléchargement gratuit
iTunes pour Mac et PC

Ouvrez iTunes pour écouter des extraits, acheter et télécharger de la musique.

Avis sur l’album

For decades, the legend of the late folksinger Karen Dalton rested on the two studio albums she released between 1969 and 1971. Dalton was all but forgotten by the time she passed away in 1993, her music career long behind her, but posthumous interest in her work dovetailed nicely with the archival spelunking that resulted in Delmore Recordings' release of previously unheard Dalton tapes. Following up on their release of a 1962 Dalton recording, the label offered up the appropriately titled 1966. This home recording captures Dalton and her then-husband Richard Tucker playing together in the cabin in rural Colorado where they sought refuge from the Greenwich Village scene, sans running water and an official address (Dalton was very literally off the map). Despite the lo-fi nature of the source tape, which was made in an ad hoc manner by a local friend, the sparse setting — just acoustic guitar and banjo — gives Dalton's distinctive voice plenty of room to do its thing. The song list is probably typical of what she was performing live at the time — in fact, she and Tucker are said to have been rehearsing for a gig during this recording. As on her studio albums, she tackles some traditional folk tunes ("Cotton Eyed Joe," "Mole in the Ground") as well as songs by her friend and fellow folkie recluse Fred Neil ("Other Side of This Life," "Little Bit of Rain") and the work of her pal and fellow drug victim Tim Hardin ("Don't Make Promises," "While You're on Your Way," "Shiloh Town"). Her version of "God Bless the Child" makes it clear why she's often regarded as the Billie Holiday of the folk world; not only did Dalton share Lady Day's lived-in tone, world-weary delivery, and troubled, foreshortened life, she had a way to take songs from almost any source and make them sound as if they'd never existed before her haunted pipes brought them into being. ~ J. Allen, Rovi

Biographie

Né(e) : 1938 à Bonham, TX

Genre : Country

Années d’activité : '60s, '70s

A cult singer, 12-string guitarist, and banjo player of the New York 1960s folk revival, Karen Dalton still remains known to very few, despite counting the likes of Bob Dylan and Fred Neil among her acquaintances. This was partly because she seldom recorded, only making one album in the 1960s — and that didn't come out until 1969, although she had been known on the Greenwich Village circuit since the beginning of the decade. It was also partly because, unlike other folksingers of the era, she...
Biographie complète