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Brotherhood

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Album Review

New Order had been so good at integrating synth and guitars (often on the same song) that fans who greeted 1986's Brotherhood with the realization that it was split into a rock side and a dance side couldn't help but be a little disappointed. Still, the songs and the band's production had reached such a high level that the concept worked superbly, without calling undue attention to itself. The rock side comes first, revealing more of the emotional side of Bernard Sumner's singing and songwriting, even leading off with acoustic guitar for one song. But Brotherhood was also a little harder than what had come before; Sumner often sang with a come-on sort of brio, matching Peter Hook's seething work on the bass. The songwriting was excellent, and the album was delivered with great pacing, especially on the first four tracks — sensuous and roiling for "Paradise," bright and emphatic on "Weirdo," reflective for "As It Is When It Was," then back to direct and upbeat on "Broken Promise." The synthesizer side was similarly assured, beginning with one of their brightest singles (and biggest transatlantic hits), "Bizarre Love Triangle." There was no dark side to Brotherhood, as there was with Low-life; after "Bizarre Love Triangle" came only the Middle Eastern fusion of "Angel Dust" and the simple, pastoral synth pop of "All Day Long" and "Every Little Counts." For better and worse, this was a New Order with nothing more to prove — witness the tossed-off lyrics and giggles on "Every Little Counts" — aside from continuing to make great music.

Customer Reviews

Stunning Early New Order

I like nearly all New Order tracks but this Album (along with Technique) is stunning - A must have for any collection

Great Album

Played this to death back in the day, their joint best album with Technique. Still sounds amazing

New Order Rock

..... So a year after the electro pop of Low-Life, we get Brotherhood. With the exception of Bizarre Love Triangle and Angel dust, Brotherhood is a rock album as the electronics are downplayed. Broken Promise could easily have fitted on Unknown Pleasure and Every Little Counts homage to Lou Reed's Walk On The Wildside is a great song to end the album.
Could they get any better? 3 years later came Technique, say no more!

Biography

Formed: 1980 in Manchester, England

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

Rising from the ashes of the legendary British post-punk unit Joy Division, the enigmatic New Order triumphed over tragedy to emerge as one of the most influential and acclaimed bands of the 1980s; embracing the electronic textures and disco rhythms of the underground club culture many years in advance of its contemporaries, the group's pioneering fusion of new wave aesthetics and dance music successfully bridged the gap between the two worlds, creating a distinctively thoughtful and oblique brand...
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