10 Songs, 48 Minutes

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3:39
3:51
4:16
3:38
4:07
4:35
5:05
4:48
2:53
11:08

Ratings and Reviews

It's about time...!

DigiDee

After a long long 6 year wait, Elevator Suite returns with a cracking second album. Lush strings, 60's influenced lounge rock with touches of the Stone Roses and the Charlattans make this album a listening pleasure. Stand out tracks are "The Wheel", "Time After Time" and the closing track "U Know That". Be sure to check out the funk soul work-out of Time Bomb. Perfect. A+++++

Suite Music

Justan Opinion

Hooray - they're back! Barefoot and S***faced was fab - and after only one listen I can tell I won't be disappointed! Same retro blend of musac and cool. Please don't make us wait so long for album number three!

Great, but don't expect another Barefoot

banzaiboy

After hearing the track "Airhead" at a club, and being compelled to buy Barefoot, I was keen to see what the boys had come up with for this much awaited second venture. Some great music, but less of an electronica feel... mostly gone are the lo-fi loops and the almost plastic lounge feel, to be replaced with some great chilled out blues jazz material... You can smell a hint of the French "Air", and Morcheeba like instrumentation in places, but with a new edge, and very well done. Perhaps not as "out there" as Barefoot, but more developed. I'm more than happy with the purchase.

About Elevator Suite

This UK-based trio comprises two DJs, Andy Childs and Paul Roberts, alongside multi-instrumentalist, Steve Grainger. Their sound is a blend of contemporary dance music production with funk and rock influences from the 60s and 70s. Childs and Roberts met in Salisbury, Wiltshire and ran an ill-fated clothes and record shop called Boom Tunes before abandoning the project and immersing themselves in the blossoming early 90s club culture. As Funk Junky, Childs recorded a track, ‘Bulldozer’ for a Plymouth-based label, but it sank without a trace. Disheartened, Childs relocated to Totnes in Devon, where he met the classically trained Grainger. Their seemingly incongruous backgrounds became a creative partnership and after recording demos, they gained the interest of London-based publishers and record companies. Their debut release for Infectious Records, ‘Man In A Towel’ was a beguiling mixture of 60s influences and a contemporary obsession with somewhat kitsch lounge music. It was named Record Of The Week on the UK’s national Radio 1 FM but problems with sampling clearances prevented the single from receiving a full commercial release. Sounding at times similar to Black Grape, Mansun and the Charlatans, their October 2000 debut, Barefoot & Shitfaced featured more funky soundtrack sounds, rock guitar, saxophone and lo-fi percussion.

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