14 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Raconteurs’ second album reflects the group’s paradoxical interests in rough-cut rockers and their thoughtful appraisal of rock music’s storied history. This is, after all, a collaboration between the harsh modern blues of White Stripes’ Jack White and power-pop songwriter Brendan Benson. There’s studio chatter and feedback, tough shards of power chord guitars, and lots of sass balanced out with well-produced stereophonic guitars, tinkering keyboards, and layers of carefully leveled harmony vocals. The title track is deliberately half-baked, an unfinished riff reveling in its rawness, but “You Don’t Understand Me” is a heartfelt piano shuffle. “The Switch and the Spur” reflects a soft psychedelic twist with horns, quickly followed up with the early-‘70s guitar wah-wah and schoolyard chant of “Hold Up”. Slide-blues highlights “Top Yourself”, another ‘70s-influenced tune that along with the refried boogie of “Attention” and organ-driven Southern rock of “Rich Kid Blues” wouldn’t be out of place on a Black Crowes album, while “Five On the Five” goes for the trademark White Stripes garage-rock crunch.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Raconteurs’ second album reflects the group’s paradoxical interests in rough-cut rockers and their thoughtful appraisal of rock music’s storied history. This is, after all, a collaboration between the harsh modern blues of White Stripes’ Jack White and power-pop songwriter Brendan Benson. There’s studio chatter and feedback, tough shards of power chord guitars, and lots of sass balanced out with well-produced stereophonic guitars, tinkering keyboards, and layers of carefully leveled harmony vocals. The title track is deliberately half-baked, an unfinished riff reveling in its rawness, but “You Don’t Understand Me” is a heartfelt piano shuffle. “The Switch and the Spur” reflects a soft psychedelic twist with horns, quickly followed up with the early-‘70s guitar wah-wah and schoolyard chant of “Hold Up”. Slide-blues highlights “Top Yourself”, another ‘70s-influenced tune that along with the refried boogie of “Attention” and organ-driven Southern rock of “Rich Kid Blues” wouldn’t be out of place on a Black Crowes album, while “Five On the Five” goes for the trademark White Stripes garage-rock crunch.

TITLE TIME
3:26
2:59
4:53
3:57
4:25
3:26
4:25
4:24
3:33
3:40
1:59
4:34
3:54
5:55

About The Raconteurs

A self-described "new band made up of old friends," the Raconteurs feature the White Stripes' Jack White and power pop maestro Brendan Benson on vocals, keyboards, and guitars, and the Greenhornes' drummer Patrick Keeler and bassist Jack Lawrence as the group's rhythm section. The idea for the band began when Benson and White collaborated on the song "Steady, as She Goes," which later became the Raconteurs' debut single. When the duo drafted Keeler and Lawrence, they became a full-fledged band. Recording together at Benson's East Grand Studio whenever they were available from their other projects, the Raconteurs recorded their debut album, Broken Boy Soldiers, over the span of a year and released it in spring 2006 to middling reviews but a Top Ten place on Billboard's album charts. That year, the band also relocated to Nashville and worked on another batch of songs in between touring and dates at festivals such as Lollapalooza. In 2008, they released the single, "Old Enough" b/w " Top Yourself," on Third Man as a joint production with Warner Brothers. ~ Heather Phares

  • ORIGIN
    Detroit, MI
  • FORMED
    2005

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