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Two Lights

Five for Fighting

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Album Review

Five for Fighting's John Ondrasik is a straight, clean, post-9/11 version of "Daniel"-era Elton John. He's got exquisite pipes, a knack for the big key changes, and a true star's sense of emotional entitlement that masks itself as introspection. If 2004's Battle for Everything saw a more assured and concise Five for Fighting reacting to its surprise success of 2001's "Superman" single, then 2006's Two Lights represents Ondrasik's complete transformation from somber troubadour into adult alternative mother-ship. With the now branded Five for Fighting, there is no hint of danger, no chance for controversy, and no way that at least half the record won't end up supplying brow-creasing melodramatic film moments and high school year-end slide shows with forced poignancy for years to come. It only takes a few minutes into the elegiac opening cut "Freedom Never Cries" to revisit the 9-11 angst/patriotism that won Ondrasik the majority of his initial public favor ("I only talk to God when somebody's about to die/I never cherished freedom/freedom never cries), a song he deftly follows with the super earnest and wistfully upbeat "World," and later "Riddle." From there it's a real hodgepodge, with detours into murderous Springsteen-esque road trips like "California Justice" and "65 Mustang." For the most part, Two Lights is a serious record about hard-working people in hard times — only the jaunty "Johnny America" and the dumb but infectious "Policeman's Xmas Party" echo early press comparisons to the more whimsical sides of Ben Folds and Billy Joel — but it's not saying anything that hasn't already been beaten into the masses since the confessional that used to house self-absorbed singer/songwriters became open to the public.

Customer Reviews

Something Different!

Great Album, listen to 100 years its fantastic! Hope these guys go far, great lyrics, great voice! great album! Thanks Youtube for this one! Carol and Doug E.R. video to this music and i was in floods!

Shines out over the average american pap

This is a fantastic album full of intelligent, melodic songs that you will listen to over and over again. The other two albums are just as good too. Five for Fighting have become my most played, most five-starred band of the last 6 months. If you like your music in the Ben Folds, Barenaked Ladies, Divine Comedy class, then you'd be mad to miss these guys.

Great Songs, Great Artist

Lucky enough to see them play live in Orlando at the House of Blues, great live act. Look out for the other 2 discs they are both excellent, a very talented singer song writer. If you like somthing that little bit different but still easily accesible then you should give this a go. Superman (Dawsons Creek) is perhaps the best known track released so far but i have to say i love Policemans Christmas Party!

Biography

Formed: 1997 in Los Angeles, CA

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Five for Fighting is the one-man band of John Ondrasik, who rose to fame in 2001 on the strength of the pop/rock ballad "Superman (It's Not Easy)." Although originally released in 2000, the single became popular after the events of September 11, 2001, which shone new light on Five for Fighting's tale of flight, insecurity, and heroics. Another Top 40 hit, "100...
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Two Lights, Five for Fighting
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