Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn’t open, click the iTunes icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
Opening the iBooks Store.If iBooks doesn't open, click the iBooks app in your Dock.Progress Indicator

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music from Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. (Expanded Version) by Dwight Yoakam, download iTunes now.

Do you already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC

Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc., Etc. (Expanded Version)

Open iTunes to preview, buy and download music.

Editors’ Notes

“Electrified bluegrass,” Dwight Yoakam loosely dubbed the blend that would make his debut, Guitars Cadillacs Etc. Etc., one of the pivotal albums in country music history. In 1986, the genre was suffering a major lull in popularity; by year’s end, Yoakam would be a superstar and one of the young leaders heading back to the roots. For all the flash of Yoakam’s persona and hits such as the Johnny Horton chestnut “Honky Tonk Man,” the disc’s hats-off to old-school virtues didn’t stop there. “Miner’s Prayer” came from the L.A.-based singer’s early life in Kentucky, where his grandfather (the album’s dedicatee) had coalmined for 40 years. This deluxe edition precedes the original album itself with a set of 1981 demos that present Yoakam’s vision almost fully wrapped, not to mention brilliantly sung. A joyfully hard-hitting club set from March 1986, the original Guitars’ month of release, completes the package. It lives up to the “electrified bluegrass” tag with versions of Bill Monroe’s “Rocky Road Blues” and “Can’t You Hear Me Calling.”

Customer Reviews

eye guy

a stonking album if u like country music like me u will love this album buy this album now you will be glad u did i was


Born: 23 October 1956 in Pikeville, KY

Genre: Country

Years Active: '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

With his stripped-down approach to traditional honky tonk and Bakersfield country, Dwight Yoakam helped return country music to its roots in the late '80s. Like his idols Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and Hank Williams, Yoakam never played by Nashville's rules; consequently, he never dominated the charts like his contemporary Randy Travis. Then again, Travis never played around with the sound and style of country music like Yoakam. On each of his records, he twists around the form enough to make it...
Full bio