11 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After two triumphant albums of piano-powered pop, London singer-songwriter Tom Odell has his feet firmly enough on the ground that he wrote and recorded Jubilee Road mostly from his living room. His third album is inspired by the friendships he formed living in East London. Odell’s memories from the terraced street include intimate tales of kissing in hallways (“Half As Good As You”) and failed-actor neighbors (“Don’t Belong in Hollywood”). The key-thumping “Son of an Only Child” channels his inner Elton John; he even declares, “I’m a rocket man” over its euphoric pop riffs. While this is his most upbeat album to date, the tender “You’re Gonna Break My Heart Tonight” is tailor-made to soundtrack failed romances everywhere.

Parental Advisory Explicit Content Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After two triumphant albums of piano-powered pop, London singer-songwriter Tom Odell has his feet firmly enough on the ground that he wrote and recorded Jubilee Road mostly from his living room. His third album is inspired by the friendships he formed living in East London. Odell’s memories from the terraced street include intimate tales of kissing in hallways (“Half As Good As You”) and failed-actor neighbors (“Don’t Belong in Hollywood”). The key-thumping “Son of an Only Child” channels his inner Elton John; he even declares, “I’m a rocket man” over its euphoric pop riffs. While this is his most upbeat album to date, the tender “You’re Gonna Break My Heart Tonight” is tailor-made to soundtrack failed romances everywhere.

Parental Advisory Explicit Content Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
28 Ratings
28 Ratings
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Amazing!! X

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Amazing

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In Retrospect.

Tom harks back to the simplicity and intimacy of his first album adding further jazz/pop/upbeat tempo elements to his repertoire and still proving he has that deeper connection to the keyboard and his ability to rock it makes him one to watch. He’s not Elton by any stretch but here he’s not trying to be. He’s far more bombastic and usually on top of a piano during a live set; the live shows do the newer songs more justice that the comfort of a studio. What’s missing is his band-driven indie style he ventured into in his brilliant second album which made Wrong Crowd so appealing seemed to have been structured by more adventurous stories and anger. He could have gone further with this style but then his charm could have been lost and so he opts to return to his more mature form of expression where he feels he treats a large venue audience as if they were sitting on the floor of his house. He’s incorporated the band structure into his live shows but he doesn’t seem to rub off here. Odell has calmed, become more reflective and retrospective in the span of 2/3 years since the last body of work. Like Florence & the Machine on their 4th album; Odell has gone for less is more and it’s a unique experience for anyone whom listens to it. He’s got the classic and modern melodies mixed with stories on old-age, death, love, vulnerability and throwing in the towel to a relationship. What feels like a private show to friends and family inside of a house at a late-night dinner party is effortlessly recreated in album form.

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