iTunes

Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn’t open, click the iTunes icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organise and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music from Fresh Cream (Remastered) by Cream, download iTunes now.

Do you already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC

Fresh Cream (Remastered)

Cream

Open iTunes to preview, buy and download music.

Album Review

Fresh Cream represents so many different firsts, it's difficult to keep count. Cream, of course, was the first supergroup, but their first album not only gave birth to the power trio, it also was instrumental in the birth of heavy metal and the birth of jam rock. That's a lot of weight for one record and, like a lot of pioneering records, Fresh Cream doesn't seem quite as mighty as what would come later, both from the group and its acolytes. In retrospect, the moments on the LP that are a bit unformed — in particular, the halting waltz of "Dreaming" never achieves the sweet ethereal atmosphere it aspires to — stand out more than the innovations, which have been so thoroughly assimilated into the vocabulary of rock & roll, but Fresh Cream was a remarkable shift forward in rock upon its 1966 release and it remains quite potent. Certainly at this early stage the trio was still grounded heavily in blues, only fitting given guitarist Eric Clapton's stint in John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, which is where he first played with bassist Jack Bruce, but Cream never had the purist bent of Mayall, and not just because they dabbled heavily in psychedelia. The rhythm section of Bruce and Ginger Baker had a distinct jazzy bent to their beat; this isn't hard and pure, it's spongy and elastic, giving the musicians plenty of room to roam. This fluidity is most apparent on the blues covers that take up nearly half the record, especially on "Spoonful," where the swirling instrumental interplay, echo, fuzz tones, and overwhelming volume constitute true psychedelic music, and also points strongly toward the guitar worship of heavy metal. Almost all the second side of Fresh Cream is devoted to this, closing with Baker's showcase "Toad," but for as hard and restless as this half of the album is, there is some lightness on the first portion of the record where Bruce reveals himself as an inventive psychedelic pop songwriter with the tense, colorful "N.S.U." and the hook- and harmony-laden "I Feel Free." Cream shows as much force and mastery on these tighter, poppier tunes as they do on the free-flowing jams, yet they show a clear bias toward the long-form blues numbers, which makes sense: they formed to be able to pursue this freedom, which they do so without restraint. If at times that does make the album indulgent or lopsided, this is nevertheless where Cream was feeling their way forward, creating their heavy psychedelic jazz-blues and, in the process, opening the door to all kinds of serious rock music that may have happened without Fresh Cream, but it just would not have happened in the same fashion as it did with this record as precedent.

Customer Reviews

Awakening

Penniless kid hitch-hikes 230 miles to London, introduced to Bluesbreakers playing at club in Wardour St, Soho; lead guitar amazes, some [16y.o.?] called Clapton.

4 yrs later hear Cream and instantly hooked, as alternative to Beatles/Stones.

Not heard this sort of rock before, fascinated by Baker's unique percussion style, Bruce has a great blues voice, Clapton, well.... 50 yrs later it still inspires and excites.

Self-indulgent? Perhaps but with the hype generated it would go to the heads of young performers (as did the acid, no doubt!). Never mind, the sounds are brilliant.

Biography

Formed: 1966 in England

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '60s, '90s, '00s

Although Cream was only together for a little more than two years, their influence was immense, both during their late-'60s peak and in the years following their breakup. Cream was the first top group to truly exploit the power-trio format, in the process laying the foundation for much blues-rock and hard rock of the 1960s and 1970s. It was with Cream, too, that guitarist Eric Clapton truly became an international superstar. Critical revisionists have tagged the band as overrated, citing the musicians'...
Full bio

Become a fan of the iTunes and App Store pages on Facebook for exclusive offers, the inside scoop on new apps and more.