10 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“I’m at an age where I’m more conscious of the message that I’m leaving,” Chip told Beats 1 host Julie Adenuga about his fourth album, released two months before his 28th birthday. “Some of us who are experienced enough, wise enough, in the rooms enough to spread a little more light and positivity should do it.” Over grime, hip-hop, Afrobeats and dancehall, he delivers his message with typical agility and whip-smart wordplay, assuming multiple roles, from rap philosopher (“Thoughts”) to lothario (“My Girl”). As ever, he’s at his most stirring when documenting London’s harshest realities, despairing at the epidemic of violence on “Good Morning Britain” and, on “Thoughts”, considering the long-term consequences of road life: “All them ends you can’t go/That’s no life you wanna live when you’re older with your kids/Ask your olders how it is/Parents’ evening with your children, paigons still after your wig.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

“I’m at an age where I’m more conscious of the message that I’m leaving,” Chip told Beats 1 host Julie Adenuga about his fourth album, released two months before his 28th birthday. “Some of us who are experienced enough, wise enough, in the rooms enough to spread a little more light and positivity should do it.” Over grime, hip-hop, Afrobeats and dancehall, he delivers his message with typical agility and whip-smart wordplay, assuming multiple roles, from rap philosopher (“Thoughts”) to lothario (“My Girl”). As ever, he’s at his most stirring when documenting London’s harshest realities, despairing at the epidemic of violence on “Good Morning Britain” and, on “Thoughts”, considering the long-term consequences of road life: “All them ends you can’t go/That’s no life you wanna live when you’re older with your kids/Ask your olders how it is/Parents’ evening with your children, paigons still after your wig.”

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