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Sweet Child (Bonus Track Edition)

Pentangle

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Album Review

Sweet Child, released in 1968, at the peak of Pentangle's career, is probably the most representative of their work. A sprawling two-record set, half recorded in the studio and half live at the Royal Festival Hall, showcases just how versatile Pentangle was in their unique brand of English folk, jazz, Celtic, blues, and pop styles. Some of the live covers are easily their finest performances. Furry Lewis' "Turn Your Money Green," sung by the delightful Jacqui McShee, swings sweetly, buttressed of course by John Renbourn and Bert Jansch's guitar tapestry. Charlie Mingus' "Haitian Flight Song" features a great solo by bassist Danny Thompson, who was easily one of the finest musicians to grace the instrument. The studio tracks are uniformly excellent as well, especially "The Time Has Come," which turns waltz time inside out. McShee, Renbourn, and Jansch all turn in career performances on this track. But these examples merely scratch the surface of Pentangle's peak. In all, Sweet Child is an awesome and delightful collection, and probably their finest hour. [The Castle CD reissue adds numerous bonus tracks, including alternate versions of "In Time," "The Trees They Do Grow High," and "Hole in the Coal" and a studio version of "Haitian Fight Song."]

Customer Reviews

Sweet Child. Pentangle

43 years since this was recorded.It is an object lesson in musicianship to modern bands.I had forgotten just how good they were.Every member of the band were incredible,and I still love jacqui mcshee. PG 5 FEB 2011.

A forgotten gem!

Gosh! It's been much too long since I heard this album, I had forgotten just had good a band the original Pentangle were. From the resonant bass solos of an impeccable Danny Thompson to the lyrical ecstasy of Jacqui McShee's voice, this album is outstanding. John and Bert sound so young!!! But I guess we all were once upon a time.
44 years, ugghh, I remember seeing Pentangle around that time, and marvelling at the gorgeous legs that Jacqui displayed in a miniskirt perched upon a bar stool... ...not just a wonderful voice!
This on-line version of the album is an absolute bargain for Pentangle fans - less than eight quid for 33 tracks - go on, you owe it to yourself to revel in this extraordinary blend of folk, blues, rock and jazz!

Awesome 45 years on!

it really doesn't get much better than this especially if you were a young aspirant amateur guitarist in the late 60s. I first heard this in 1967, age 21, and in 2014 it is still just as hauntingly wonderful as then. For me Pentangle to the wold of folk-rock were like Queen and Freddie Mercury to the later world of rock...different styles, but every member a top class musician. John Renbourne, Bert Jansch, Jackie McShea, Danny Thompson, wonderful to find this superb recording available for download after four decades. It still makes the hairs on the back of ones neck stand on end especially if you heard them in the late 60s. Nothing but five stars!

Biography

Formed: 1968

Genre: Singer/Songwriter

Years Active: '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s

Were Pentangle a folk group, a folk-rock group, or something that resists classification? They could hardly be called a rock & roll act; they didn't use electric instruments often, and were built around two virtuoso guitarists, Bert Jansch and John Renbourn, who were already well-established on the folk circuit before the group formed. Yet their hunger for eclectic experimentation fit into the milieu of late-'60s progressive rock and psychedelia well, and much of their audience came from the...
Full bio