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Foundations of Modern Social Theory - Video

by Iván Szelényi

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Description

This course provides an overview of major works of social thought from the beginning of the modern era through the 1920s. Attention is paid to social and intellectual contexts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and contributions to contemporary social analysis. Writers include Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Adam Smith, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim

Customer Reviews

Professor should have fact-checked

I got as far as the lecture on Hobbs, and was horrified to find that the professor made several mistakes in this presentation of English history during the Elizabethan era. For instance, his powerpoint states that Henry XVIII's first wife was Catherine of Avignon, instead of Aragon, and that Queen Mary I was forced to 'resign' the throne and was later excecuted by Elizabeth I. He clearly doesn't know the difference between Mary Queen of Scotts and Mary I of England. There are some other mistakes, but those were the worst.

I am very surprised that Yale University allowed this video to be shown! I stopped listening to the course right then, because I don't know whether one could trust the rest of the material.

On the other hand, some of my friends, and my relatives in England, had a good laugh about the quality of American higher education.