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This Could Be the Start of Something (Remastered)

Mark Murphy

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Album Review

Mark Murphy's first album was originally put out by Capitol and was last available as a 1985 Pausa LP. Backed by various West Coast all-stars (including trumpeters Conte and Pete Candoli, either Bill Holman or Richie Kamuca on tenor, and a rhythm section headed by pianist Jimmy Rowles), Murphy sings well, if conventionally. The 13 standards include six concise songs (such as "The Lady Is a Tramp" and "Falling in Love with Love") while the second part of the album is a lengthy medley. Bill Holman provided the swinging arrangements. A good start to a major career.

Biography

Born: 14 March 1932 in Fulton, NY

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s

Mark Murphy often seemed to be the only true jazz singer of his generation. A young, hip post-bop vocalist, Murphy spent most of his career sticking to the standards — and often presented radically reworked versions of those standards while many submitted to the lure of the lounge singer — during the artistically fallow period of the 1970s and '80s. Marketed as a teen idol by Capitol during the mid-'50s, Murphy deserted the stolid world of commercial pop for a series of exciting dates...
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