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Causes perdues et musiques tropicales

Bernard Lavilliers

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Album Review

Notable journeyman Bernard Lavilliers uses his well-traveled background for musical inspiration yet again on his 19th studio album, Causes Perdues et Musiques Tropicales, which features collaborations with musicians from around the globe, including Angolan folksinger Bonga Kwenda ("Angola"), Cape Verdean guitarist Teofilo Chantre ("La Nuit Nous Appartient"), and French percussionist Mino Cinelu ("Coupeurs de Cannes") on a bossa nova-tinged effort that also includes a song written by the "Latin Bruce Springsteen," Rubén Blades ("Cafard"). ~ Jon O'Brien, Rovi

Biography

Born: 07 October 1946 in Firminy, France

Genre: French Pop

Years Active: '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

With the body of a bouncer, the looks of a movie star, and a low, sensual voice, Bernard Lavilliers started as a left-wing singer following in the footsteps of Léo Ferré. This boxer-singer rose to stardom in France in the mid-'70s (other Francophone countries followed quickly) and became an icon of the free-thinking singer/songwriter, the conscience of the French bourgeoisie. A serious traveler and occasional reporter, Lavilliers has made long stays in many South American...
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Causes perdues et musiques tropicales, Bernard Lavilliers
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Contemporaries