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C'mon Kids

The Boo Radleys

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Album Review

Wake Up! brought the Boo Radleys pop success that they weren't sure what to do with. After embracing the album's number one success, the group eventually recoiled from the spotlight and Martin Carr wrote C'mon Kids as a direct response to the group's celebrity status in the U.K. Simply put, C'mon Kids is an attempt to scare away any of the fellow travelers who welcomed the sunny-sounding pop of Wake Up! It's a gnarled, twisted, and distorted album, as dense as Giant Steps and as loud as the Boos' early EPs. And, if you can make it through the murky guitars, fragments of songs, altered vocals, and tape effects, some melodies and creatively crafted songs make the album nearly as rewarding as Giant Steps or Wake Up! It takes time to get into C'mon Kids, though. At first, it's disarming to hear Sice scream his vocals and the Boos play heavy riffs. After a while the melodies begin to reveal themselves, as do the clever song structures and inversions of the band's psychedelic hooks and folk tendencies. C'mon Kids might not be as accessible as even Giant Steps, but it displays a feverish sense of purpose and a perverse willfulness to refashion their sound, making it an easy album to admire, if not love.

Biography

Formed: 1988 in Liverpool, England

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '80s, '90s

Formed in Liverpool in 1988, the English guitar pop group the Boo Radleys developed a dedicated cult following in the early '90s before crossing over into the mainstream in the middle of the decade. Originally, the Radleys were one of the lesser lights of the loud, noisy My Bloody Valentine-inspired psychedelic trance pop bands labeled "shoegazers" by the British weekly music press. By the mid-'90s the Boo Radleys had developed into a more straightforward...
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