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Journey to the End of the Night

  R HD Closed Captioning

Eric Eason

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Plot Summary

A gritty, crime thriller about an illicit transaction gone awry…Two Americans in exile—Rosso (Scott Glenn) and his son, Paul (Brendan Fraser)—have been carving out a living in Brazil running a nightclub-brothel, but they both harbor dreams of getting out of the business once and for all. It all depends on one person—a Nigerian immigrant named Wemba (Mos Def)—who must make his way safely through the perilous, nocturnal gauntlet of Sao Paulo.

Customer Reviews

Mos Definitely not worth it

Few things sadden me more than watching a fine, well-directed cast struggle to escape the confines of a wretched script. Why is it so many directors think they're also scriptwriters? This reads like a suburban American teenager's vision of Sao Paolo's underworld: sophomoric, predictable, and with dialogue that, when occasionally it raises its numb skull above the mire of cliche and self-conscious melodrama, finds itself getting whacked with the incoherence stick. The "climax" is particularly dreadful, with an embarrassing pile-up of non-sequiturs and handguns, as Eason confirms his amazing lack of structural sensibility by simply killing off every character who stands in the way of his ham-handed, moralist's idea of closure. Do us a favor, MIster Eason: stick to directing, and stay away from the keyboard.

Mos Def is gradually becoming one of the finer actors working in the English language: for 99 cents, it's almost worth renting this just to watch his subtly genius morphing into a Nigerian dishwasher. But not quite. Neither he, nor all the sepia tinting in the world, can help "Journey" find its way out of the dark.