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Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace

Foo Fighters

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iTunes Editors' Notes

With 2005’s In Your Honor, the Foo Fighters distinctly divided their approach into acoustic and electric collections that helped the band fully explore their disparate influences without watering down either approach. For the follow-up, 2007’s Echoes, Silence, Patience and Grace, the group string their various approaches together for what flows as a naturally stylistically diverse album, comfortable expressing its angst with distorted guitars and emotionally charged pleading (“But, Honestly”) or with the piano and gentle orchestration of the album’s closing ballad (“Home”). Singer Dave Grohl has always seemed most comfortable leading a hard rock charge, and “The Pretender,” “Cheer Up, Boys” and “Long Road to Ruin” are readymades for the Foo Fighters’ live assault. However, the album’s most surprising and affecting moments are the subdued shades of the whispered forecasts of “Stranger Things Have Happened” and the duet with acoustic guitar virtuoso Kaki King for “Ballad of the Beaconsfield Miners,” where Grohl displays an emotive range that establishes him as a first-rate singer, in case there was any doubt.

Customer Reviews

Brilliant.

Imagine all the previous Foo Fighters' albums put in a blender with the best bits distilled out of the resulting mix. Echoes, Silence. Patience & Grace is exactly that. The album is full of heavy rock filled with pop melodies and brilliant, reflective, slower tracks. There are at least five good singles in this album (The Pretender, Let It Die, Come Alive, Stranger Things Have Happened, and the pop-filled Summer's End).The opening track and first single from the album, The Pretender, is a nice way for the band to hold the hand of fans who were more into the rock half of the previously released In Your Honor double album, as the band takes them to new places. This album will result in a Foo Fighters live show will be hard to beat anywhere in the world - it will a much more rounded show, similar to the live show that Queen were able to produce at their peak in the mid-eighties. This album is equal if not better than the band's second album, The Color and the Shape, which was more raw than ESPG, but less complex.

Epic (soft) Rock?

Undoubtedly the new Foo Fighters album is epic... But since Dave has got in touch with his softer paced acoustic chai latte side, i can't help but feel that it deminishes the strenght of this album. The eclectic pace does feel a little awkward at times, so i can't help but wonder if the Foo Fighters are better off keeping their folk and rock separate. Double albums are the way forward boys! I had hoped for more of "The Pretender" vibe, but never mind, you'll still catch me humming along to "Home". So don't worry – It'll grow on you.

Brilliant!

Pre-ordered it a few weeks before and awoke to find it down loading on a cold Monday morning, made...my....day! Great mix of traditional foo-fighter-esqe hard rock and Dave Grohl's piano parts are an excellent contrast. Come Alive is the best track on the album, with The Pretender and Home closely behind.

Biography

Formed: 1995 in Seattle, WA

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

When Foo Fighters released a debut album written and recorded entirely by leader Dave Grohl — at that point known only as the powerhouse drummer for Nirvana — in the summer of 1995, few would have guessed that the group would wind up as the one band to survive the '90s alt-rock explosion unscathed. Other bands burned brighter but they flamed out, breaking up after scoring a hit or two, while the Foos steadily racked up success after success, filling stadiums around the world while staying...
Full Bio