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Lost and Found

B.D. Lenz

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Album Review

New Jersey-based guitarist B.D. Lenz writes tightly arranged charts in a fusion style reminiscent of Larry Carlton, Lee Ritenour, and Mike Stern. Containing elements of funk, R&B, rock, and Latin, Lenz's music is palatable but not especially distinctive. His solos, however, are fluid and interesting; his tone is clean and full bodied. And his band is on the money. Geoff Mattoon contributes strong tenor and soprano sax work throughout. Keyboardist Daniel Mintseris, electric bassist James Rosocha, and drummer Tom Cottone are the other core players. Making guest appearances are acoustic bassist Ron Velosky, drummers Brendan Buckley and Greg Federico, and percussionist Joe Mekler. Some of the highlights include Rosocha's bass solo on "Lazy Bones," Lenz's ferocious solo on "Grandma Rosocha," and the 5/4 riffs of "Primitive." ~ David R. Adler, Rovi

Biography

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '90s, '00s

Jazz fusion guitarist B.D. Lenz forged his identity by combining his background in mathematics with his knowledge of music theory to produce the right combination of grooves and melodies on his Tell the World (1997) and Lost and Found (1999), both independently recorded and produced at S.S. Sound Studios in Hamilton Square, NJ. The B.D. Lenz group consisted of Lenz (electric guitar), Geoff Mattoon (sax), James Rosocha...
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Lost and Found, B.D. Lenz
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