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Dance Fever (Re-Recorded Versions)

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Album Review

Though Dance Fever doesn't quite cover the ground of Rhino's Trammps collection, This Is Where the Happy People Go: The Best of the Trammps, the Park South label does a decent job collecting many of the finer moments of the Trammps catalog. "Disco Inferno," the Trammps gargantuan hit from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, makes an appearance here, of course, as do lesser-known numbers like the lovely ballad "You Make Me Feel Brand New" and their fist charting single "Zip Went the Strings of My Heart." This is a nice and enjoyable collection of some of the Trammps' finer moments.

Biography

Formed: 1973 in Philadelphia, PA

Genre: R&B/Soul

Years Active: '70s, '80s

Disco's most soulful vocal group began in the '60s as the Volcanos, and were also called the Moods. Gene Faith was the original lead vocalist, with Earl Young, Jimmy Ellis, guitarist Dennis Harris, keyboardist Ron Kersey, organist John Hart, bassist Stanley Wade, and drummer Michael Thomas. But by the time they'd gone through various identities and emerged as the Trammps in the mid-'70s, the lineup featured lead vocalist Ellis, Norman Harris, and Stanley Wade, Robert Upchurch and Young. A snappy...
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Dance Fever (Re-Recorded Versions), The Trammps
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Contemporaries