Öppna iTunes Store.Om iTunes inte öppnas klickar du på appsymbolen för iTunes i Dock eller på Windows-skrivbordet.Förloppsindikator
Öppnar iBooks Store.Om iBooks inte öppnas klickar du på iBooks i Dock.Förloppsindikator

I iTunes är det otroligt enkelt att ordna en samling av digitala mediefiler och lägga till nya.

Det går inte att hitta iTunes på datorn. Hämta iTunes nu så kan du provlyssna på och köpa musik från The Glasgow School av Orange Juice.

Har du redan iTunes? Klicka på Jag har iTunes om du vill öppna det nu.

Jag har iTunes Gratis hämtning
iTunes för Mac och PC

The Glasgow School

Öppna iTunes när du vill provlyssna, köpa och hämta musik.


Orange Juice's three albums, along with compilations of various shapes and sizes, have floated in and out of print throughout the years. This hasn't made it convenient for anyone curious about the band, whether the interest was sparked by Haircut 100, the Jesus and Mary Chain, Belle & Sebastian, Franz Ferdinand, the unlikely mainstream success of Edwyn Collins' "A Girl Like You," the history of post-punk, or the birth of indie pop. The Glasgow School, released in 2005 by Domino, contains the band's four singles for Postcard, the bulk of Ostrich Churchyard (a disc released in 1992, containing early versions of what would become 1982's You Can't Hide Your Love Forever), a Stars on 45-style version of "Simply Thrilled Honey," and a crude cover of the Ramones' "I Don't Care." For a lot of people, the material here (dating no later than 1981) is where Orange Juice begins and ends. The band signed to Polydor soon after the latest song on this disc was recorded, and they promptly gave their sound a coat of shiny wax — so they helped invent indie pop, only to abandon it before their first album. Though the notion extends throughout Orange Juice's discography, they were nothing if not fearless. What other way is there to describe lyrics like "I wore my fringe like Roger McGuinn's/I was hoping to impress/So frightfully camp — you laughed," or their wholly convincing (if occasionally gawky) way of bouncing the jangly folk-rock of the Byrds off the fat-bottomed disco drive of Chic, all the while creating an identity all their own? Both the singles and the Ostrich Churchyard takes are as crafty as they are crude, and if you can't get past the amateurishness, there's plenty of winsome attitude to win you over. This disc serves as proof that, along with Josef K, Associates, Altered Images, Simple Minds, Cocteau Twins, and the Scars, Orange Juice helped make Scotland a very productive resource during the post-punk/new wave era.


never better

without OJ there would never been a Franz Ferdinand or The Smiths. Of all beautiful pop from Scotland, this is the crown juvel. Blue Boy is the ultimate popsong.

I Agree

Pretty much sums up what was giong around in Edinburgh at the time with an alternative scene of their own although I believe that Franz Ferdinand are ripping off Josef K rather than Edwyn and the boys. Check out "Texas Fever"! Sounds a bit like Lloyd Cole meeting the Go Betweens. Anyway: If you like the new crap like Franz Ferdinand you will probably enjoy this just as much. Hail Hail Alan Horne!


Bildades: 1976 i Glasgow, Scotland

Genre: Alternativt

Aktiva år: '70s, '80s

The leaders of the Scottish neo-pop uprising Orange Juice formed in Glasgow in late 1976. Originally dubbed the Nu-Sonics, the group comprised vocalist/guitarist Edwyn Collins, guitarist James Kirk, bassist David McClymont, and drummer Steven Daly; following the formation of the Postcard label by Collins protégé Alan Horne, the quartet renamed itself Orange Juice in 1979, adopting the new moniker as well as an aura of romantic innocence as a direct reaction to the increasingly macho aggression of...
Hela biografin
The Glasgow School, Orange Juice
Visa i iTunes


Det finns inte tillräckligt många betyg för att visa ett genomsnitt för denna/detta album.


Inspirerad av den här artisten