12 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Legendary singer/songwriter Carole King’s first studio album in more than 10 years is a gentle, festive collection of holiday tunes; it’s produced by her daughter Louise Goffin, who cowrote three of the original tunes. Those include the bossa nova–based “Christmas Paradise,” the pop-inflected “Christmas in the Air,” and the touching ballad “New Year’s Day.” The piano is front and center, with King leaning toward adult-contemporary lite-FM arrangements that leave plenty of room for her to sing with style. The timeless “My Favorite Things” is straightforward, with a nod toward jazz. “Sleigh Ride” adds a mild funk to the standard. “Everyday Will Be Like a Holiday,” with horns and exquisite guitar, evokes memories of King’s early Brill Building days. “Chanukah Prayer” plays like a nightclub spiritual. “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” highlights King’s vocal finesse. “Do You Hear What I Hear” has never sounded warmer or more inviting. King brings her personal touch to even the most obvious holiday fare; she’s still first and foremost a major pop stylist.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Legendary singer/songwriter Carole King’s first studio album in more than 10 years is a gentle, festive collection of holiday tunes; it’s produced by her daughter Louise Goffin, who cowrote three of the original tunes. Those include the bossa nova–based “Christmas Paradise,” the pop-inflected “Christmas in the Air,” and the touching ballad “New Year’s Day.” The piano is front and center, with King leaning toward adult-contemporary lite-FM arrangements that leave plenty of room for her to sing with style. The timeless “My Favorite Things” is straightforward, with a nod toward jazz. “Sleigh Ride” adds a mild funk to the standard. “Everyday Will Be Like a Holiday,” with horns and exquisite guitar, evokes memories of King’s early Brill Building days. “Chanukah Prayer” plays like a nightclub spiritual. “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” highlights King’s vocal finesse. “Do You Hear What I Hear” has never sounded warmer or more inviting. King brings her personal touch to even the most obvious holiday fare; she’s still first and foremost a major pop stylist.

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1:54
2:30
3:25
3:07
3:09
2:33
2:52
3:18
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3:17
3:55

About Carole King

Carole King examined the complicated realities of love with a tenderness and swagger rare among her more plaintive ’70s folk-rock peers. In the early ’60s, alongside folks like Neil Diamond and her then-husband Gerry Goffin, King was an endlessly versatile Brill Building songwriter. There, she elevated girl-group anthems like The Shirelles’ “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow” beyond mere bubblegum, tapped into gospel’s volcanic power alongside a young Aretha Franklin, and embraced wistful psychedelia, cowriting the Monkees smash “Pleasant Valley Sunday.” Then declaring her independence with a mix of vulnerable rock and visceral soul, the native New Yorker defined and deepened the singer/songwriter era’s emotional intimacy with albums like her 1971 solo breakthrough, Tapestry. She also wrote the template for transitioning from a behind-the-scenes songwriter into a full-fledged star. Whether pairing her pained explorations of fraying romance with the seductive longing of classic R&B balladry ("It's Too Late") or strutting like a blues singer as she celebrated the life-changing power of lust ("I Feel the Earth Move"), King shaped multiple generations of confessional singers as wildly distinctive as Tori Amos, Erykah Badu, Amy Winehouse, and Adele.

  • ORIGIN
    New York, NY [Brooklyn]
  • GENRE
    Pop
  • BORN
    February 9, 1942

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