11 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Following the tasty musical melting pot that was The Golden Hour, Firewater returns with its seventh album and shows that leader Tod A's passion for global and theatrical crossbreeding still burns brightly. Recorded in Turkey and Tel Aviv, during the blossoming Arab Spring, these songs weave together international color, old-school punk (see: The Clash), and enough spit and vinegar to get rebel juices flowing in even the most docile listeners. The opening track, "A Little Revolution," is an irresistible call to arms (and the dance floor); it's propelled by finely barbed guitars, swinging trombones, and a neck-snapping percussive beat. That track segues into "Glitter Days," which opens with the exotic, warbly call of a Middle Eastern wind instrument (the zurna) and a delightful blend of drums (both Middle Eastern and Indian percussion are used throughout). Yet the tune morphs into a guitar-driven, Mekons-ish number (Tod A's vocals even feel slightly like the worn and warm Jon Langford here). There are also shades of klezmer, ska, bhangra, and Balkan folk, which—along with tight melodies and sticky choruses—makes this a delicious and thought-provoking brew.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Following the tasty musical melting pot that was The Golden Hour, Firewater returns with its seventh album and shows that leader Tod A's passion for global and theatrical crossbreeding still burns brightly. Recorded in Turkey and Tel Aviv, during the blossoming Arab Spring, these songs weave together international color, old-school punk (see: The Clash), and enough spit and vinegar to get rebel juices flowing in even the most docile listeners. The opening track, "A Little Revolution," is an irresistible call to arms (and the dance floor); it's propelled by finely barbed guitars, swinging trombones, and a neck-snapping percussive beat. That track segues into "Glitter Days," which opens with the exotic, warbly call of a Middle Eastern wind instrument (the zurna) and a delightful blend of drums (both Middle Eastern and Indian percussion are used throughout). Yet the tune morphs into a guitar-driven, Mekons-ish number (Tod A's vocals even feel slightly like the worn and warm Jon Langford here). There are also shades of klezmer, ska, bhangra, and Balkan folk, which—along with tight melodies and sticky choruses—makes this a delicious and thought-provoking brew.

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