12 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This Knoxville sextet are heavily influenced by those European church-burning, corpse-painted bands of yore, but they also infuse a dose of good old American grindcore into the mix, as well as technical metalcore’s lightning fast changes and the rapid-fire attacks culled from old-school hardcore punk. A New Era Of Corruption is Whitchapel’s first non-conceptual album, though negative themes abound. The opening aural assault “Devolver” touches on what Devo’s entire M.O. was built on — the de-evolution of mankind and how society has turned most people into a hateful and violent breed. Of course you really have to listen closely to get this because lead screamer Phil Bozeman inflects as though he stayed up all night doing shots of shrapnel and broken glass while an avalanche of guitars crash down and wreak havoc. “Breeding Violence” is a salient number riding on a heavy artillery of rhythm and the impressive employ of three guitarists, each with their own discernable styles. The aptly titled “The Darkest Day of Man” is easily the darkest and strongest song here.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This Knoxville sextet are heavily influenced by those European church-burning, corpse-painted bands of yore, but they also infuse a dose of good old American grindcore into the mix, as well as technical metalcore’s lightning fast changes and the rapid-fire attacks culled from old-school hardcore punk. A New Era Of Corruption is Whitchapel’s first non-conceptual album, though negative themes abound. The opening aural assault “Devolver” touches on what Devo’s entire M.O. was built on — the de-evolution of mankind and how society has turned most people into a hateful and violent breed. Of course you really have to listen closely to get this because lead screamer Phil Bozeman inflects as though he stayed up all night doing shots of shrapnel and broken glass while an avalanche of guitars crash down and wreak havoc. “Breeding Violence” is a salient number riding on a heavy artillery of rhythm and the impressive employ of three guitarists, each with their own discernable styles. The aptly titled “The Darkest Day of Man” is easily the darkest and strongest song here.

TITLE TIME

About Whitechapel

Formed in 2006 by Phil Bozeman, Brandon Cagle, and Ben Savage, tech-heavy Knoxville, Tennessee-based death metal outfit Whitechapel (named for the London neighborhood where the notorious Jack the Ripper disposed of most of his victims) blend grindcore, hardcore, and black metal into an unholy trinity of audio violence. After rounding out the lineup with guitarist Alex Wade, bassist Gabe Crisp, and drummer Derek Martin, the band's 2006 self-produced EP led to a European record deal with the Siege of Amida label and a distribution deal with Candlelight, where the band released its full-length debut, The Somatic Defilement, in 2007. That same year, the band parted ways with Savage and Martin, who were replaced by guitarist Zach Householder and drummer Kevin Lane. After signing on with Metal Blade, the band returned with its sophomore effort, This Is Exile, in 2008, followed shortly thereafter by A New Era of Corruption in 2010. In 2011, Whitechapel parted ways with Lane, replacing the drummer with Ben Harclerode, who made his debut on the remix EP Recorrupted later that year. Whitechapel returned the following year with a self-titled album, which was followed by their fifth album, Our Endless War, in 2014. 2015 saw the release of the crowd-funded live CD/DVD Brotherhood of the Blade, which fans regarded as a high point. The band re-entered the studio at the beginning of 2016 with producer Mark Lewis (Black Dahlia Murder, Cannibal Corpse), completing 11 new songs that showcased an evolution in their deathcore sound to include both clean and dirty vocals. The title track was streamed as the set's first single in April; the album followed in June. ~ James Christopher Monger

ORIGIN
Knoxville, TN
GENRE
Rock
FORMED
2006

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