15 Songs, 1 Hour 14 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This album is Mastered for iTunes. Neil Peart exhibits his rhythmic dexterity with drum showcase "The Rhythm Method," but that one brief exercise aside, A Show Of Hands focuses on the Canadian power trio's carefully crafted songwriting. Rush spent the ‘70s writing elaborate, conceptual pieces that required deeper concentration than most. By the ‘80s, spurred on by the success of Permanent Waves and Moving Pictures, the band turned to writing tighter, more concise tunes, and with 1982's Signals added a serious amount of keyboard and synthesizer support to its once guitar-heavy attack. This sonic shift never lessened the band's aggression, but it did add several layers of ethereal and otherworldly expression to its aura. Like other Rush live albums, Hands also serves as a "greatest hits" collection for this particular era of the ‘80s. While "Closer to the Heart" is the one true throwback, "The Big Money," "Subdivisions," "Distant Early Warning," "Force Ten," and "Mission" represent the band's most striking '80s material, delivered with the exact precision expected from this meticulous group.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This album is Mastered for iTunes. Neil Peart exhibits his rhythmic dexterity with drum showcase "The Rhythm Method," but that one brief exercise aside, A Show Of Hands focuses on the Canadian power trio's carefully crafted songwriting. Rush spent the ‘70s writing elaborate, conceptual pieces that required deeper concentration than most. By the ‘80s, spurred on by the success of Permanent Waves and Moving Pictures, the band turned to writing tighter, more concise tunes, and with 1982's Signals added a serious amount of keyboard and synthesizer support to its once guitar-heavy attack. This sonic shift never lessened the band's aggression, but it did add several layers of ethereal and otherworldly expression to its aura. Like other Rush live albums, Hands also serves as a "greatest hits" collection for this particular era of the ‘80s. While "Closer to the Heart" is the one true throwback, "The Big Money," "Subdivisions," "Distant Early Warning," "Force Ten," and "Mission" represent the band's most striking '80s material, delivered with the exact precision expected from this meticulous group.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
18 Ratings
18 Ratings
AFW2K ,

Diehard Rush fan

Let me start here: I love this live album, but compared to Exit Stage Left it is not near as good. The "album review" by Itunes is completely horrible and do not listen to a word it states. Tracks forgotten over time including "Mission, Turn the Page"? Those were on the hold your fire album the year before this tour was conducted.... Anyways, the set list is what makes this not such a hot live album. Dominated by the 80's tracks throughout (songs which I love) but ending on a song like Closer to the Heart or throwing Witch Hunt in there just doesnt make it a great setlist. I remember reading about how this tour almost broke Rush up as a band, and you can almost hear it on this album. Geddy still sounds great, but he doesnt put his heart into it as he does on the newer live albums. Go buy Snakes and Arrows live, it has an amazing setlist and you will not be disappointed.

Strwbryflds ,

It's a love/hate relationship with this album

The bad: 80s saturated synths, sterile recording and production, Geddy's coonskin cap hairdo. The good: Rush were TIGHT in this era. Probably the peak of their touring years, which would last maybe through Roll the Bones. They were still amazing in the 90s and beyond, just not as tight as you'll hear on this album.

Reckia6 ,

Show me your hands.

If you really loved Rush from the mid to late 80's, then you will probably love this album and if you don't then you won't! My least favorite Rush live album. It would have been nice to hear more songs from Signals. I like the video much better because they go a little further back in their catalog. For Rush fanatics only.

More By Rush

You May Also Like